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A METHOD OF PRESERVING FOREIGN BODY SPECIMENS RECOVERED BY ENDOSCOPY

A METHOD OF PRESERVING FOREIGN BODY SPECIMENS RECOVERED BY ENDOSCOPY Abstract IN THE past, one of the minor problems in the work of the endoscopist with foreign bodies has been preservation of the specimens. No suitable mediums had been found in which to mount in collection form all the different specimens encountered. Pins, coins and other such objects were easily saved in their natural state, but the convenient handling of such widely differing specimens as a raw oyster or peanut required special technics and, often, unbreakable specimen containers. A chicken bone and a garnet bead mounted in plastic. The specimen on the left has been permanently inscribed. Recently, in this department, we have been using "bio-plastic," manufactured by Ward's Natural Science Establishment, Inc.1 The results have been highly satisfactory. The specimens mounted range from chicken bones to fresh shrimp. Such specimens as peanuts retain their full shape, and colored objects retain the color seen at operation. In addition to preserving References 1. "Bio-plastic" and authoritative data on it may be obtained from Ward's Natural Science Establishment, Inc., P. O. Box 24, Beechwood Station, Rochester, N. Y. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

A METHOD OF PRESERVING FOREIGN BODY SPECIMENS RECOVERED BY ENDOSCOPY

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 51 (5) – May 1, 1950

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1950 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1950.00700020786013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract IN THE past, one of the minor problems in the work of the endoscopist with foreign bodies has been preservation of the specimens. No suitable mediums had been found in which to mount in collection form all the different specimens encountered. Pins, coins and other such objects were easily saved in their natural state, but the convenient handling of such widely differing specimens as a raw oyster or peanut required special technics and, often, unbreakable specimen containers. A chicken bone and a garnet bead mounted in plastic. The specimen on the left has been permanently inscribed. Recently, in this department, we have been using "bio-plastic," manufactured by Ward's Natural Science Establishment, Inc.1 The results have been highly satisfactory. The specimens mounted range from chicken bones to fresh shrimp. Such specimens as peanuts retain their full shape, and colored objects retain the color seen at operation. In addition to preserving References 1. "Bio-plastic" and authoritative data on it may be obtained from Ward's Natural Science Establishment, Inc., P. O. Box 24, Beechwood Station, Rochester, N. Y.

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1950

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