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A Look Ahead at the Future of Diabetes Prevention and Treatment

A Look Ahead at the Future of Diabetes Prevention and Treatment Editorials represent the opinions EDITORIAL of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association. A Look Ahead at the Future of Diabetes Prevention and Treatment funders that conservative projections about event rates are David E. Arterburn, MD, MPH usually warranted. The low rates may have resulted from Patrick J. O’Connor, MD, MA, MPH (1) improved cardiovascular risk factor control in both groups through medical treatment; (2) improved clinical care af- ORE THAN 25 MILLION US ADULTS HAVE TYPE 2 ter acute cardiovascular events; (3) enrollment of a healthier- diabetes, and this number will likely double than-expected patient cohort; and (4) excluding patients with by 2050 given expected changes in demo- high baseline cardiovascular risk. To date, Look AHEAD Mgraphics and continued progression of the obe- results confirm that a lifestyle intervention resulting in weight 1,2 sity epidemic. Identifying cost-effective strategies to man- loss may benefit some patients—especially those with early age diabetes is essential because diabetes is responsible for diabetes. However, compared with routine diabetes care, the more than $116 billion in direct medical care costs, or 5% lifestyle intervention appears to do little to reduce major car- of all US health care spending. diovascular http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

A Look Ahead at the Future of Diabetes Prevention and Treatment

JAMA , Volume 308 (23) – Dec 19, 2012

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2012.144749
pmid
23287825
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorials represent the opinions EDITORIAL of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association. A Look Ahead at the Future of Diabetes Prevention and Treatment funders that conservative projections about event rates are David E. Arterburn, MD, MPH usually warranted. The low rates may have resulted from Patrick J. O’Connor, MD, MA, MPH (1) improved cardiovascular risk factor control in both groups through medical treatment; (2) improved clinical care af- ORE THAN 25 MILLION US ADULTS HAVE TYPE 2 ter acute cardiovascular events; (3) enrollment of a healthier- diabetes, and this number will likely double than-expected patient cohort; and (4) excluding patients with by 2050 given expected changes in demo- high baseline cardiovascular risk. To date, Look AHEAD Mgraphics and continued progression of the obe- results confirm that a lifestyle intervention resulting in weight 1,2 sity epidemic. Identifying cost-effective strategies to man- loss may benefit some patients—especially those with early age diabetes is essential because diabetes is responsible for diabetes. However, compared with routine diabetes care, the more than $116 billion in direct medical care costs, or 5% lifestyle intervention appears to do little to reduce major car- of all US health care spending. diovascular

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 19, 2012

References