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A High Risk of Hospitalization Following Release From Correctional Facilities in Medicare Beneficiaries

A High Risk of Hospitalization Following Release From Correctional Facilities in Medicare... ImportanceLittle is known about the risk of individuals who are released from correctional facilities, a time when there may be discontinuity in care. ObjectiveTo study the risk for hospitalizations among former inmates soon after their release from correctional facilities. DesignRetrospective cohort study. ParticipantsData from Medicare administrative claims for 110 419 fee-for-service beneficiaries who were released from a correctional facility from 2002 through 2010 and controls matched by age, sex, race, Medicare status, and residential zip code. Main Outcomes and MeasuresHospitalization rates and specifically those for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions 7, 30, and 90 days after release. ResultsOf 110 419 released inmates, 1559 individuals (1.4%) were hospitalized within 7 days after release; 4285 individuals (3.9%) within 30 days; and 9196 (8.3%) within 90 days. The odds of hospitalization was higher for released inmates compared with those of matched controls (within 7 days: odds ratio [OR], 2.5 [95% CI, 2.3-2.8]; within 30 days: OR, 2.1 [95% CI, 2.0-2.2]; and within 90 days: OR, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.7-1.9]). Compared with matched controls, former inmates were more likely to be hospitalized for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions (within 7 days: OR, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.4-2.1]; within 30 days: OR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.5-1.8]; and within 90 days: OR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.5-1.7]). Conclusions and RelevanceAbout 1 in 70 former inmates are hospitalized for an acute condition within 7 days of release, and 1 in 12 by 90 days, a rate much higher than in the general population. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

A High Risk of Hospitalization Following Release From Correctional Facilities in Medicare Beneficiaries

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.9008
pmid
23877707
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ImportanceLittle is known about the risk of individuals who are released from correctional facilities, a time when there may be discontinuity in care. ObjectiveTo study the risk for hospitalizations among former inmates soon after their release from correctional facilities. DesignRetrospective cohort study. ParticipantsData from Medicare administrative claims for 110 419 fee-for-service beneficiaries who were released from a correctional facility from 2002 through 2010 and controls matched by age, sex, race, Medicare status, and residential zip code. Main Outcomes and MeasuresHospitalization rates and specifically those for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions 7, 30, and 90 days after release. ResultsOf 110 419 released inmates, 1559 individuals (1.4%) were hospitalized within 7 days after release; 4285 individuals (3.9%) within 30 days; and 9196 (8.3%) within 90 days. The odds of hospitalization was higher for released inmates compared with those of matched controls (within 7 days: odds ratio [OR], 2.5 [95% CI, 2.3-2.8]; within 30 days: OR, 2.1 [95% CI, 2.0-2.2]; and within 90 days: OR, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.7-1.9]). Compared with matched controls, former inmates were more likely to be hospitalized for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions (within 7 days: OR, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.4-2.1]; within 30 days: OR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.5-1.8]; and within 90 days: OR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.5-1.7]). Conclusions and RelevanceAbout 1 in 70 former inmates are hospitalized for an acute condition within 7 days of release, and 1 in 12 by 90 days, a rate much higher than in the general population.

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 23, 2013

References

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