Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

A CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF TUMORS.

A CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF TUMORS. What constitutes malignity histologically and clinically? From earliest times tumors were grouped into two classes, the benign and malignant. Long before exact methods of observation permitted closer discrimination, the physician recognized these two groups. From the patient's standpoint, the most important question is whether the tumor is or is not innocent in character. To the surgeon, too, this division of neoplasmata, based as it were upon prognostic considerations is all important. It establishes the time for and the character of any operative interference. It continues the patient under observation for a period of years, or leads to his dismissal after operation. And, therefore, it is proper, though perhaps very unscientific, to view tumors in this light. What is understood by the malignity of a neoplasm? If we are to consider it synonymous with danger to life, tumors in themselves innocent, would by location become malignant. This is obviously not what http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

A CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF TUMORS.

JAMA , Volume XII (2) – Jan 12, 1889

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/a-contribution-to-the-study-of-tumors-XGKy7o76Ms
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1889 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1889.02400790005001b
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

What constitutes malignity histologically and clinically? From earliest times tumors were grouped into two classes, the benign and malignant. Long before exact methods of observation permitted closer discrimination, the physician recognized these two groups. From the patient's standpoint, the most important question is whether the tumor is or is not innocent in character. To the surgeon, too, this division of neoplasmata, based as it were upon prognostic considerations is all important. It establishes the time for and the character of any operative interference. It continues the patient under observation for a period of years, or leads to his dismissal after operation. And, therefore, it is proper, though perhaps very unscientific, to view tumors in this light. What is understood by the malignity of a neoplasm? If we are to consider it synonymous with danger to life, tumors in themselves innocent, would by location become malignant. This is obviously not what

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 12, 1889

There are no references for this article.