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A CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF THE DIAGNOSIS OF TYPHOID FEVER BY MEANS OF THE BLOOD.

A CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF THE DIAGNOSIS OF TYPHOID FEVER BY MEANS OF THE BLOOD. In a recent article upon the subject of continued fevers,1 its distinguished author commenting upon anomalous typhoid, writes "it will lurk and hide its features completely, where it is unsuspected the difficulties attending its clear discernment from certain continued fevers of considerable duration not typhoid, may bafflle even the most sagacious physician." Among the febrile conditions the diagnosis of which may offer at times extreme difficulties of differentiation, he enumerates remittent and relapsing fevers; influenza; the the "ardent fever" of the tropics; "thermic" fever (Guitéras); "asthenic" simple fever (Murchison); "starvation" fever (DaCosta); "Malta" or "rock" fever (Milner); atypical continued fever" (Cain), from a supposed septic agency in the soil; "cypress" fever (probably relapsing fever); the "simple continued fever" described by Baumgarten (doubtful as to its being anomalous typhoid); the prolonged fevers arising in connection with local conditions, as from miliary tubercle, the fever of fecal accumulations, at times closely http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

A CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF THE DIAGNOSIS OF TYPHOID FEVER BY MEANS OF THE BLOOD.

JAMA , Volume XXVIII (6) – Feb 6, 1897

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1897 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1897.02440060001001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In a recent article upon the subject of continued fevers,1 its distinguished author commenting upon anomalous typhoid, writes "it will lurk and hide its features completely, where it is unsuspected the difficulties attending its clear discernment from certain continued fevers of considerable duration not typhoid, may bafflle even the most sagacious physician." Among the febrile conditions the diagnosis of which may offer at times extreme difficulties of differentiation, he enumerates remittent and relapsing fevers; influenza; the the "ardent fever" of the tropics; "thermic" fever (Guitéras); "asthenic" simple fever (Murchison); "starvation" fever (DaCosta); "Malta" or "rock" fever (Milner); atypical continued fever" (Cain), from a supposed septic agency in the soil; "cypress" fever (probably relapsing fever); the "simple continued fever" described by Baumgarten (doubtful as to its being anomalous typhoid); the prolonged fevers arising in connection with local conditions, as from miliary tubercle, the fever of fecal accumulations, at times closely

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 6, 1897

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