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A Consulting Surgeon in the Near East.

A Consulting Surgeon in the Near East. The author records his experiences as a surgeon at Gallipoli, in Egypt and in Palestine. The story is told as a simple narrative describing climate, supplies and transports, the hardships and difficulties that were overcome, and the final triumph. The clinical problems were not essentially different from those on other fronts. The sanitary problems were, however, distinctive; for example, the construction of a pipe line 15 miles long to carry water into the city of Jerusalem. The book is well illustrated and a worth-while contribution to the medical history of the World War. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

A Consulting Surgeon in the Near East.

JAMA , Volume 76 (8) – Feb 19, 1921

A Consulting Surgeon in the Near East.

Abstract


The author records his experiences as a surgeon at Gallipoli, in Egypt and in Palestine. The story is told as a simple narrative describing climate, supplies and transports, the hardships and difficulties that were overcome, and the final triumph. The clinical problems were not essentially different from those on other fronts. The sanitary problems were, however, distinctive; for example, the construction of a pipe line 15 miles long to carry water into the city of Jerusalem. The...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1921 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1921.02630080054040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The author records his experiences as a surgeon at Gallipoli, in Egypt and in Palestine. The story is told as a simple narrative describing climate, supplies and transports, the hardships and difficulties that were overcome, and the final triumph. The clinical problems were not essentially different from those on other fronts. The sanitary problems were, however, distinctive; for example, the construction of a pipe line 15 miles long to carry water into the city of Jerusalem. The book is well illustrated and a worth-while contribution to the medical history of the World War.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 19, 1921

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