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A COMPARISON OF THE VALUE OF MILK AND ORANGES AS SUPPLEMENTARY LUNCH FOR UNDERWEIGHT CHILDREN

A COMPARISON OF THE VALUE OF MILK AND ORANGES AS SUPPLEMENTARY LUNCH FOR UNDERWEIGHT CHILDREN The study of nutrition, as applied to the school child, has at the present time a well defined place in the school program. Physical fitness is an unparalleled asset to the adult. That some at least of the disability found in the adult may be laid to defective nutrition during childhood was probably first indicated by investigations in England following the Boer War, when two thirds of the recruits were rejected because of physical inperfections. Emerson1 states: "There is no evidence in the weighing and measuring of children that malnutrition, if left untreated, tends on the whole to correct itself. The percentage of malnutrition for older children is no less than that for younger children. It is, then, fair to assume that the nation's list of physically unfit is supplied by this group of malnourished children in the schools." The conclusion has thus been reached that rational feeding in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

A COMPARISON OF THE VALUE OF MILK AND ORANGES AS SUPPLEMENTARY LUNCH FOR UNDERWEIGHT CHILDREN

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1923 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1923.04120160050005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The study of nutrition, as applied to the school child, has at the present time a well defined place in the school program. Physical fitness is an unparalleled asset to the adult. That some at least of the disability found in the adult may be laid to defective nutrition during childhood was probably first indicated by investigations in England following the Boer War, when two thirds of the recruits were rejected because of physical inperfections. Emerson1 states: "There is no evidence in the weighing and measuring of children that malnutrition, if left untreated, tends on the whole to correct itself. The percentage of malnutrition for older children is no less than that for younger children. It is, then, fair to assume that the nation's list of physically unfit is supplied by this group of malnourished children in the schools." The conclusion has thus been reached that rational feeding in

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1923

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