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A Case of Undetermined Tropical Ulceration Involving the Nose, Pharynx and Larynx, With Histological Findings

A Case of Undetermined Tropical Ulceration Involving the Nose, Pharynx and Larynx, With... THE JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS DISEASES VOL. XXIV January, 1906 NO. 1. By JOHN A. FORDYCE, M.D.Professor of Dermatology and Syphilology, University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York City. * * * I have often shown well marked cases of yaws to non-professional persons, in order to observe what their descriptions of the tubercles would be; and I have never yet observed anyone to omit to compare them to raspberries [Figure], whence, of course, frambæsia. Charlouis hoped vainly to lessen confusion in a locality where the pathological condition that occupies us seems to have been non-existent by replacing the opposite term frambæsia with a histologically descriptive and a locative name. Jeanselme’s personal investigations in Cochin China and Annam (reported at the meeting of the British Medical Association in July, 1905), and Cannac’s and Montel’s admirable and exact clinical contributions regarding yaws, appear to establish this disease as independent of syphilis. Doubtless, as A. Le Dentu says, the alleged sequels of yaws and their relations to syphilis, may not be convincingly discussed until the whole question of tropical syphilis is elucidated; and I think that it may well be admitted that this great field has been up to the present, if not entirely untilled, but little more than scratched. Figure. View LargeDownload Tropical ulceration in secondary yaws caused by Treponema pallidum, subspecies pertune. J Cutan Dis. January 1906;24:1-13. Editor's Comment Two months prior to this article, Dr Aldo Castellani published a brief report in the British Medical Journal describing a unique spirochete from 2 cases of yaws. He declined to propose any etiologic significance for the organism, but his subsequent researches proved beyond doubt that Treponema pertenue was indeed the cause of yaws. Test your own knowledge of the history of tropical medicine. He held professorships at the Ross Institute in London, the University of Rome, Tulane University, Louisiana State University, and the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Lisbon Portugal, among others. This peripatetic physician first described pitted keratolysis while living in Ceylon and dermatosis papulosa nigra when visiting Panama. His therapeutic inventions ran the gamut from the first combined vaccine to a popular purple tincture. A superb administrator as well as astute clinician, his background in tropical diseases proved invaluable during military campaigns in colonial wars and World Wars I and II. In addition to being named a Count and a Senator by King Victor Emmanuel III of Italy, this microbiologist received numerous foreign honors including a British knighthood and election to the French Legion d’Honneur. While working in Uganda in 1903, he discovered the trypanosome that causes sleeping sickness and how it is transmitted. Though his first love was the laboratory, this Italian physician had a thriving clinical practice that included among its patients many luminaries, including Mussolini, Valentino, Marconi, and seemingly most of the British and European royal families. Answers: It’s all about Sir Aldo! http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

A Case of Undetermined Tropical Ulceration Involving the Nose, Pharynx and Larynx, With Histological Findings

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 142 (1) – Jan 1, 2006

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.142.1.12
Publisher site
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Abstract

THE JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS DISEASES VOL. XXIV January, 1906 NO. 1. By JOHN A. FORDYCE, M.D.Professor of Dermatology and Syphilology, University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York City. * * * I have often shown well marked cases of yaws to non-professional persons, in order to observe what their descriptions of the tubercles would be; and I have never yet observed anyone to omit to compare them to raspberries [Figure], whence, of course, frambæsia. Charlouis hoped vainly to lessen confusion in a locality where the pathological condition that occupies us seems to have been non-existent by replacing the opposite term frambæsia with a histologically descriptive and a locative name. Jeanselme’s personal investigations in Cochin China and Annam (reported at the meeting of the British Medical Association in July, 1905), and Cannac’s and Montel’s admirable and exact clinical contributions regarding yaws, appear to establish this disease as independent of syphilis. Doubtless, as A. Le Dentu says, the alleged sequels of yaws and their relations to syphilis, may not be convincingly discussed until the whole question of tropical syphilis is elucidated; and I think that it may well be admitted that this great field has been up to the present, if not entirely untilled, but little more than scratched. Figure. View LargeDownload Tropical ulceration in secondary yaws caused by Treponema pallidum, subspecies pertune. J Cutan Dis. January 1906;24:1-13. Editor's Comment Two months prior to this article, Dr Aldo Castellani published a brief report in the British Medical Journal describing a unique spirochete from 2 cases of yaws. He declined to propose any etiologic significance for the organism, but his subsequent researches proved beyond doubt that Treponema pertenue was indeed the cause of yaws. Test your own knowledge of the history of tropical medicine. He held professorships at the Ross Institute in London, the University of Rome, Tulane University, Louisiana State University, and the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Lisbon Portugal, among others. This peripatetic physician first described pitted keratolysis while living in Ceylon and dermatosis papulosa nigra when visiting Panama. His therapeutic inventions ran the gamut from the first combined vaccine to a popular purple tincture. A superb administrator as well as astute clinician, his background in tropical diseases proved invaluable during military campaigns in colonial wars and World Wars I and II. In addition to being named a Count and a Senator by King Victor Emmanuel III of Italy, this microbiologist received numerous foreign honors including a British knighthood and election to the French Legion d’Honneur. While working in Uganda in 1903, he discovered the trypanosome that causes sleeping sickness and how it is transmitted. Though his first love was the laboratory, this Italian physician had a thriving clinical practice that included among its patients many luminaries, including Mussolini, Valentino, Marconi, and seemingly most of the British and European royal families. Answers: It’s all about Sir Aldo!

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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