Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A CASE OF ACUTE MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA IN AN INFANT

A CASE OF ACUTE MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA IN AN INFANT The case here reported as being of unusual interest is that of a girl, infant L. F., Hebrew, nine months of age, who was admitted to the Thomas Wilson Sanitarium, July 11, 1913. Family History. —The father and mother were both well, aged 36 and 33 years, respectively. They had lost four other children in infancy, one from scarlet fever and three from "summer complaint." The patient was the only living child. There was no history of syphilis or of tuberculosis. The parents were apparently in comfortable circumstances and the hygienic condition of their home was described as "good." Past History. —The patient's birth was normal, weight 7½ pounds. She was exclusively breast fed for six months, and for the last three months a whole milk mixture had been used as a supplementary feeding. The patient had never been ill before and had gained steadily. Present Illness. —The baby is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

A CASE OF ACUTE MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA IN AN INFANT

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/a-case-of-acute-myelogenous-leukemia-in-an-infant-8UX9GBMm0C
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1916 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1916.04110120059006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The case here reported as being of unusual interest is that of a girl, infant L. F., Hebrew, nine months of age, who was admitted to the Thomas Wilson Sanitarium, July 11, 1913. Family History. —The father and mother were both well, aged 36 and 33 years, respectively. They had lost four other children in infancy, one from scarlet fever and three from "summer complaint." The patient was the only living child. There was no history of syphilis or of tuberculosis. The parents were apparently in comfortable circumstances and the hygienic condition of their home was described as "good." Past History. —The patient's birth was normal, weight 7½ pounds. She was exclusively breast fed for six months, and for the last three months a whole milk mixture had been used as a supplementary feeding. The patient had never been ill before and had gained steadily. Present Illness. —The baby is

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1916

There are no references for this article.