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Webs, Blogospheres, and the American Journal of Neuroradiology

Webs, Blogospheres, and the American Journal of Neuroradiology Most of us are somewhat familiar with the history of the internet. In the early 1960s, Joseph C.R. Licklider created the first computer network at the US Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. 1 The project then extended to outside sites including major academic centers such as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and University of California, Berkeley. Shortly thereafter, one of the major forward steps leading to the transfer of news and messages took place at Duke University and here at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. In the 1980s, several government agencies (including NASA) developed what was truly the first decentralized internet. Soon, connections were established with Norway and Great Britain, and promptly afterward, the World Wide Web (WWW) was born. Telephone connections and access to business and commerce rapidly followed. The "killer application" that solidified the role that the WWW plays nowadays in our lives was e-mail. The second "killer app" was search engines. Although some people think of life as impossible without Google and e-mail, these will change soon, too. Younger, digital-native generations are using less e-mail and migrating toward instant messaging, blogs, and other social interaction options. The term Web 1.0 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

Webs, Blogospheres, and the American Journal of Neuroradiology

American Journal of Neuroradiology , Volume 30 (6): 1077 – Jun 1, 2009

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroradiology.
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A1554
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Most of us are somewhat familiar with the history of the internet. In the early 1960s, Joseph C.R. Licklider created the first computer network at the US Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. 1 The project then extended to outside sites including major academic centers such as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and University of California, Berkeley. Shortly thereafter, one of the major forward steps leading to the transfer of news and messages took place at Duke University and here at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. In the 1980s, several government agencies (including NASA) developed what was truly the first decentralized internet. Soon, connections were established with Norway and Great Britain, and promptly afterward, the World Wide Web (WWW) was born. Telephone connections and access to business and commerce rapidly followed. The "killer application" that solidified the role that the WWW plays nowadays in our lives was e-mail. The second "killer app" was search engines. Although some people think of life as impossible without Google and e-mail, these will change soon, too. Younger, digital-native generations are using less e-mail and migrating toward instant messaging, blogs, and other social interaction options. The term Web 1.0

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Jun 1, 2009

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