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The Oculomotor Cistern: Anatomy and High-Resolution Imaging

The Oculomotor Cistern: Anatomy and High-Resolution Imaging This Article Figures Only Full Text Full Text (PDF) All Versions of this Article: ajnr.A1089v1 29/7/1344 most recent Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Services Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in PubMed Alert me to new issues of the journal Download to citation manager Citing Articles Citing Articles via HighWire Citing Articles via CrossRef Citing Articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Everton, K.L. Articles by Harnsberger, H.R. Search for Related Content PubMed PubMed Citation Articles by Everton, K.L. Articles by Harnsberger, H.R. Hotlight (NEW!) What's Hotlight? American Journal of Neuroradiology 29:1344-1348, August 2008 © 2008 American Society of Neuroradiology HEAD & NECK The Oculomotor Cistern: Anatomy and High-Resolution Imaging K.L. Everton a , U.A. Rassner a , A.G. Osborn a and H.R. Harnsberger a a From the Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah Please address correspondence to Anne G. Osborn, MD, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, 1A71 University Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah 84132; e-mail: Anne.Osborn@hsc.utah.edu BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The oculomotor cistern (OMC) is a small CSF-filled dural cuff that invaginates into the cavernous sinus, surrounding the third cranial nerve (CNIII). It is used by neurosurgeons to mobilize CNIII during cavernous sinus surgery. In this article, we present the OMC imaging spectrum as delineated on 1.5T and 3T MR images and demonstrate its involvement in cavernous sinus pathology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined 78 high-resolution screening MR images of the internal auditory canals (IAC) obtained for sensorineural hearing loss. Cistern length and diameter were measured. Fifty randomly selected whole-brain MR images were evaluated to determine how often the OMC can be visualized on routine scans. Three volunteers underwent dedicated noncontrast high-resolution MR imaging for optimal OMC visualization. RESULTS: One or both OMCs were visualized on 75% of IAC screening studies. The right cistern length averaged 4.2 ± 3.2 mm; the opening diameter (the porus) averaged 2.2 ± 0.8 mm. The maximal length observed was 13.1 mm. The left cistern length averaged 3.0 ± 1.7 mm; the porus diameter averaged 2.1 ±1.0 mm, with a maximal length of 5.9 mm. The OMC was visualized on 64% of routine axial T2-weighted brain scans. CONCLUSION: The OMC is an important neuroradiologic and surgical landmark, which can be routinely identified on dedicated thin-section high-resolution MR images. It can also be identified on nearly two thirds of standard whole-brain MR images. This article has been cited by other articles: A. Dincer, S. Kohan, and M.M. Ozek Is All "Communicating" Hydrocephalus Really Communicating? Prospective Study on the Value of 3D-Constructive Interference in Steady State Sequence at 3T AJNR Am. J. Neuroradiol., November 1, 2009; 30(10): 1898 - 1906. Abstract Full Text PDF Home Subscribe Author Instructions Submit Online Search the AJNR Archives Feedback Help Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroradiology. Print ISSN: 0195-6108 Online ISSN: 1936-959X http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

The Oculomotor Cistern: Anatomy and High-Resolution Imaging

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroradiology.
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A1089
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This Article Figures Only Full Text Full Text (PDF) All Versions of this Article: ajnr.A1089v1 29/7/1344 most recent Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Services Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in PubMed Alert me to new issues of the journal Download to citation manager Citing Articles Citing Articles via HighWire Citing Articles via CrossRef Citing Articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Everton, K.L. Articles by Harnsberger, H.R. Search for Related Content PubMed PubMed Citation Articles by Everton, K.L. Articles by Harnsberger, H.R. Hotlight (NEW!) What's Hotlight? American Journal of Neuroradiology 29:1344-1348, August 2008 © 2008 American Society of Neuroradiology HEAD & NECK The Oculomotor Cistern: Anatomy and High-Resolution Imaging K.L. Everton a , U.A. Rassner a , A.G. Osborn a and H.R. Harnsberger a a From the Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah Please address correspondence to Anne G. Osborn, MD, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, 1A71 University Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah 84132; e-mail: Anne.Osborn@hsc.utah.edu BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The oculomotor cistern (OMC) is a small CSF-filled dural cuff that invaginates into the cavernous sinus, surrounding the third cranial nerve (CNIII). It is used by neurosurgeons to mobilize CNIII during cavernous sinus surgery. In this article, we present the OMC imaging spectrum as delineated on 1.5T and 3T MR images and demonstrate its involvement in cavernous sinus pathology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined 78 high-resolution screening MR images of the internal auditory canals (IAC) obtained for sensorineural hearing loss. Cistern length and diameter were measured. Fifty randomly selected whole-brain MR images were evaluated to determine how often the OMC can be visualized on routine scans. Three volunteers underwent dedicated noncontrast high-resolution MR imaging for optimal OMC visualization. RESULTS: One or both OMCs were visualized on 75% of IAC screening studies. The right cistern length averaged 4.2 ± 3.2 mm; the opening diameter (the porus) averaged 2.2 ± 0.8 mm. The maximal length observed was 13.1 mm. The left cistern length averaged 3.0 ± 1.7 mm; the porus diameter averaged 2.1 ±1.0 mm, with a maximal length of 5.9 mm. The OMC was visualized on 64% of routine axial T2-weighted brain scans. CONCLUSION: The OMC is an important neuroradiologic and surgical landmark, which can be routinely identified on dedicated thin-section high-resolution MR images. It can also be identified on nearly two thirds of standard whole-brain MR images. This article has been cited by other articles: A. Dincer, S. Kohan, and M.M. Ozek Is All "Communicating" Hydrocephalus Really Communicating? Prospective Study on the Value of 3D-Constructive Interference in Steady State Sequence at 3T AJNR Am. J. Neuroradiol., November 1, 2009; 30(10): 1898 - 1906. Abstract Full Text PDF Home Subscribe Author Instructions Submit Online Search the AJNR Archives Feedback Help Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroradiology. Print ISSN: 0195-6108 Online ISSN: 1936-959X

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Aug 1, 2008

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