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The ASNR-ACR-RSNA Common Data Elements Project: What Will It Do for the House of Neuroradiology?

The ASNR-ACR-RSNA Common Data Elements Project: What Will It Do for the House of Neuroradiology? PRACTICEPERSPECTIVES The ASNR-ACR-RSNA Common Data Elements Project: What Will It Do for the House of Neuroradiology? X A.E. Flanders and X J.E. Jordan ABSTRACT SUMMARY: The American Society of Neuroradiology has teamed up with the American College of Radiology and the Radiological Society of North America to create a catalog of neuroradiology common data elements that addresses specific clinical use cases. Fundamentally, a common data element is a question, concept, measurement, or feature with a set of controlled responses. This could be a measurement, subjective assessment, or ordinal value. Common data elements can be both machine- and human-generated. Rather than redesigning neuroradiology reporting, the goal is to establish the minimum number of “essential” concepts that should be in a report to addressaclinicalquestion.Asmedicineshiftstowardvalue-basedservicecompensationmethodologies,therewillbeanevengreaterneed to benchmark quality care and allow peer-to-peer comparisons in all specialties. Many government programs are now focusing on these measures,themostrecentbeingtheMerit-BasedIncentivePaymentSystemandtheMedicareAccessChildren’sHealthInsuranceProgram Reauthorization Act of 2015. Standardized or structured reporting is advocated as one method of assessing radiology report quality, and common data elements are a means for expressing these concepts. Incorporating common data elements into clinical practice fosters a number of very useful downstream processes including establishing benchmarks for quality-assurance programs, ensuring more accurate billing, improving communication to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

The ASNR-ACR-RSNA Common Data Elements Project: What Will It Do for the House of Neuroradiology?

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
© 2019 by American Journal of Neuroradiology
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A5780
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PRACTICEPERSPECTIVES The ASNR-ACR-RSNA Common Data Elements Project: What Will It Do for the House of Neuroradiology? X A.E. Flanders and X J.E. Jordan ABSTRACT SUMMARY: The American Society of Neuroradiology has teamed up with the American College of Radiology and the Radiological Society of North America to create a catalog of neuroradiology common data elements that addresses specific clinical use cases. Fundamentally, a common data element is a question, concept, measurement, or feature with a set of controlled responses. This could be a measurement, subjective assessment, or ordinal value. Common data elements can be both machine- and human-generated. Rather than redesigning neuroradiology reporting, the goal is to establish the minimum number of “essential” concepts that should be in a report to addressaclinicalquestion.Asmedicineshiftstowardvalue-basedservicecompensationmethodologies,therewillbeanevengreaterneed to benchmark quality care and allow peer-to-peer comparisons in all specialties. Many government programs are now focusing on these measures,themostrecentbeingtheMerit-BasedIncentivePaymentSystemandtheMedicareAccessChildren’sHealthInsuranceProgram Reauthorization Act of 2015. Standardized or structured reporting is advocated as one method of assessing radiology report quality, and common data elements are a means for expressing these concepts. Incorporating common data elements into clinical practice fosters a number of very useful downstream processes including establishing benchmarks for quality-assurance programs, ensuring more accurate billing, improving communication to

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Jan 1, 2019

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