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Stent-Supported Aneurysm Coiling: A Literature Survey of Treatment and Follow-Up

Stent-Supported Aneurysm Coiling: A Literature Survey of Treatment and Follow-Up BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stent-supported aneurysm coiling has been utilized with increasing frequency over the past few years, particularly for addressing treatment of complex and wide-neck aneurysms. A sizable body of literature describing various experiences with stent-supported coiling now exists. The purpose of this research was to carry out a comprehensive literature survey of stent-supported aneurysm coiling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A survey of papers reporting results with stent-assisted aneurysm coiling through January 2011 was conducted to identify the prevalence of stent-related and other complications, occlusion rates, and clinical and angiographic follow-up data. RESULTS: Thirty-nine articles with 1517 patients met inclusion criteria for initial analysis, follow-up analysis, or both. Overall, 9% of cases were confounded by a technical stent-related issue, including 4% failure of deployment. The overall procedure complication rate was 19%, with periprocedural mortality of 2.1%. Approximately 45% of aneurysms were completely occluded at first treatment session, increasing to 61% on follow-up. Approximately 3.5% in-stent stenosis and 0.6% stent occlusion were observed at angiographic follow-up. Delayed stroke or transient ischemic attack was reported in 3% of subjects. Within a subset of articles, the incidence of stent-related issues in the first 10 patients was significantly higher than in subsequent subjects, supporting the notion of a procedural “learning curve.” CONCLUSIONS: In experienced hands, the morbidity of stent-supported coiling is somewhat higher compared with “traditional” coiling. As might be expected, execution of the procedure appears improved with experience. Complete occlusion rates remain somewhat low. More and longer term angiographic follow-up information is needed to understand delayed stent-related issues and to better define the durability of treatment. ABBREVIATIONS: OR odds ratio http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

Stent-Supported Aneurysm Coiling: A Literature Survey of Treatment and Follow-Up

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by the American Society of Neuroradiology.
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A2719
pmid
22033717
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stent-supported aneurysm coiling has been utilized with increasing frequency over the past few years, particularly for addressing treatment of complex and wide-neck aneurysms. A sizable body of literature describing various experiences with stent-supported coiling now exists. The purpose of this research was to carry out a comprehensive literature survey of stent-supported aneurysm coiling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A survey of papers reporting results with stent-assisted aneurysm coiling through January 2011 was conducted to identify the prevalence of stent-related and other complications, occlusion rates, and clinical and angiographic follow-up data. RESULTS: Thirty-nine articles with 1517 patients met inclusion criteria for initial analysis, follow-up analysis, or both. Overall, 9% of cases were confounded by a technical stent-related issue, including 4% failure of deployment. The overall procedure complication rate was 19%, with periprocedural mortality of 2.1%. Approximately 45% of aneurysms were completely occluded at first treatment session, increasing to 61% on follow-up. Approximately 3.5% in-stent stenosis and 0.6% stent occlusion were observed at angiographic follow-up. Delayed stroke or transient ischemic attack was reported in 3% of subjects. Within a subset of articles, the incidence of stent-related issues in the first 10 patients was significantly higher than in subsequent subjects, supporting the notion of a procedural “learning curve.” CONCLUSIONS: In experienced hands, the morbidity of stent-supported coiling is somewhat higher compared with “traditional” coiling. As might be expected, execution of the procedure appears improved with experience. Complete occlusion rates remain somewhat low. More and longer term angiographic follow-up information is needed to understand delayed stent-related issues and to better define the durability of treatment. ABBREVIATIONS: OR odds ratio

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Jan 1, 2012

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