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Sigmoid Sinus Diverticulum, Dehiscence, and Venous Sinus Stenosis: Potential Causes of Pulsatile Tinnitus in Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension?

Sigmoid Sinus Diverticulum, Dehiscence, and Venous Sinus Stenosis: Potential Causes of Pulsatile... ORIGINAL RESEARCH HEAD & NECK Sigmoid Sinus Diverticulum, Dehiscence, and Venous Sinus Stenosis: Potential Causes of Pulsatile Tinnitus in Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension? X J.A. Lansley, X W. Tucker, X M.R. Eriksen, X P. Riordan-Eva, and X S.E.J. Connor ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Pulsatile tinnitus is experienced by most patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. The patho- physiology remains uncertain; however, transverse sinus stenosis and sigmoid sinus diverticulum/dehiscence have been proposed as potential etiologies. We aimed to determine whether the prevalence of transverse sinus stenosis and sigmoid sinus diverticulum/ dehiscence was increased in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension and pulsatile tinnitus relative to those without pulsatile tinnitus and a control group. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CT vascular studies of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension with pulsatile tinnitus (n  42), without pulsatile tinnitus (n 37), and controls (n 75) were independently reviewed for the presence of severe transverse sinus stenosis and sigmoid sinus diverticulum/dehiscence according to published criteria. The prevalence of transverse sinus stenosis and sigmoid sinus diverticulum/dehiscence in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension with pulsatile tinnitus was compared with that in the nonpulsatile tinnitus idiopathic intracranial hypertension group and the control group. Further comparisons included differing degrees of transverse http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

Sigmoid Sinus Diverticulum, Dehiscence, and Venous Sinus Stenosis: Potential Causes of Pulsatile Tinnitus in Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension?

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
© 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A5277
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL RESEARCH HEAD & NECK Sigmoid Sinus Diverticulum, Dehiscence, and Venous Sinus Stenosis: Potential Causes of Pulsatile Tinnitus in Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension? X J.A. Lansley, X W. Tucker, X M.R. Eriksen, X P. Riordan-Eva, and X S.E.J. Connor ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Pulsatile tinnitus is experienced by most patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. The patho- physiology remains uncertain; however, transverse sinus stenosis and sigmoid sinus diverticulum/dehiscence have been proposed as potential etiologies. We aimed to determine whether the prevalence of transverse sinus stenosis and sigmoid sinus diverticulum/ dehiscence was increased in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension and pulsatile tinnitus relative to those without pulsatile tinnitus and a control group. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CT vascular studies of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension with pulsatile tinnitus (n  42), without pulsatile tinnitus (n 37), and controls (n 75) were independently reviewed for the presence of severe transverse sinus stenosis and sigmoid sinus diverticulum/dehiscence according to published criteria. The prevalence of transverse sinus stenosis and sigmoid sinus diverticulum/dehiscence in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension with pulsatile tinnitus was compared with that in the nonpulsatile tinnitus idiopathic intracranial hypertension group and the control group. Further comparisons included differing degrees of transverse

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Sep 1, 2017

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