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Preliminary Experience with Stent-Assisted Coiling of Aneurysms Arising from Small (<2.5 mm) Cerebral Vessels Using The Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device

Preliminary Experience with Stent-Assisted Coiling of Aneurysms Arising from Small (<2.5 mm)... ORIGINAL RESEARCH INTERVENTIONAL Preliminary Experience with Stent-Assisted Coiling of Aneurysms Arising from Small (<2.5 mm) Cerebral Vessels Using The Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device X C.-C. Wang, X W. Li, X Z.-Z. Feng, X B. Hong, X Y. Xu, X J.-M. Liu, and X Q.-H. Huang ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support (LVIS) stent is a new device recently introduced for the treatment of wide-neck intracranial aneurysms. This single-center study presents the authors’ preliminary experience using the LVIS stent to treat saccular aneurysms with parent arteries smaller than 2.5 mm. MATERIALSANDMETHODS: AneurysmswithaLVISstentusedinasmallparentvessel(2.5mmindiameter)betweenOctober2014and April 2016 were included. Procedure-related complications, angiographic results, clinical outcomes, and midterm follow-up data were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: A total of 22 patients was studied, including 5 ruptured and 17 unruptured aneurysms. Most of the aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation (90.9%). Stent placement in the parent arteries measuring 1.7–2.4 mm in diameter (mean, 2.1 mm) was successful in 100% of cases. Procedure-related complication developed in 1 patient (4.5%) who presented with aneurysm rupture. No permanent morbidity and mortality occurred. Immediate angiographic outcome showed complete occlusion in 8 aneurysms (36.4%), neck residual in 8 (36.4%), and residual aneurysm in 6 (27.3%). All patients http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

Preliminary Experience with Stent-Assisted Coiling of Aneurysms Arising from Small (&lt;2.5 mm) Cerebral Vessels Using The Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
© 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A5145
pmid
28385886
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL RESEARCH INTERVENTIONAL Preliminary Experience with Stent-Assisted Coiling of Aneurysms Arising from Small (<2.5 mm) Cerebral Vessels Using The Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device X C.-C. Wang, X W. Li, X Z.-Z. Feng, X B. Hong, X Y. Xu, X J.-M. Liu, and X Q.-H. Huang ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support (LVIS) stent is a new device recently introduced for the treatment of wide-neck intracranial aneurysms. This single-center study presents the authors’ preliminary experience using the LVIS stent to treat saccular aneurysms with parent arteries smaller than 2.5 mm. MATERIALSANDMETHODS: AneurysmswithaLVISstentusedinasmallparentvessel(2.5mmindiameter)betweenOctober2014and April 2016 were included. Procedure-related complications, angiographic results, clinical outcomes, and midterm follow-up data were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: A total of 22 patients was studied, including 5 ruptured and 17 unruptured aneurysms. Most of the aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation (90.9%). Stent placement in the parent arteries measuring 1.7–2.4 mm in diameter (mean, 2.1 mm) was successful in 100% of cases. Procedure-related complication developed in 1 patient (4.5%) who presented with aneurysm rupture. No permanent morbidity and mortality occurred. Immediate angiographic outcome showed complete occlusion in 8 aneurysms (36.4%), neck residual in 8 (36.4%), and residual aneurysm in 6 (27.3%). All patients

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Jun 1, 2017

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