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Perspectives

Perspectives The Helix nebula (NGC 7293) is a poorly named “planetary nebula” located in the constellation of Aquarius, and sometimes referred to as the “Eye of Sauron.” Planetary nebulas have nothing to do with planets and were erroneously named because they seemed to resemble gas-giant planets with the equipment of the time (circa 1824). The dying of a star causes the ejection of its outer gaseous layers and leaves behind a white dwarf star (center of the eye). This image was acquired as a series of 96 5-minute exposures (8 hours) using red, green, and blue filters. The telescope was a 12.5” Ritchey-Chretien telescope, f/9 on a Paramount ME mount situated in Australia. The camera was an Apogee Alta U16 CCD with Astrodon filters. The images were processed using PixInsight, Photoshop, and Topaz Labs Adjust AI and DeNoise AI. Jeffrey S. Ross, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, Arizona AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 44:357 Apr 2023 www.ajnr.org 357 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
© 2023 by American Journal of Neuroradiology
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.p0133
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Helix nebula (NGC 7293) is a poorly named “planetary nebula” located in the constellation of Aquarius, and sometimes referred to as the “Eye of Sauron.” Planetary nebulas have nothing to do with planets and were erroneously named because they seemed to resemble gas-giant planets with the equipment of the time (circa 1824). The dying of a star causes the ejection of its outer gaseous layers and leaves behind a white dwarf star (center of the eye). This image was acquired as a series of 96 5-minute exposures (8 hours) using red, green, and blue filters. The telescope was a 12.5” Ritchey-Chretien telescope, f/9 on a Paramount ME mount situated in Australia. The camera was an Apogee Alta U16 CCD with Astrodon filters. The images were processed using PixInsight, Photoshop, and Topaz Labs Adjust AI and DeNoise AI. Jeffrey S. Ross, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, Arizona AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 44:357 Apr 2023 www.ajnr.org 357

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Apr 1, 2023

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