Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: Complication Avoidance and Technique Optimization

Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: Complication Avoidance and Technique Optimization Fortunately, complications with PV (Table 1) have been for the most part uncommon. Awareness of the potential for complications and attention to detail will allow one to avoid these in most circumstances. View this table: In this window In a new window TABLE 1: Vertebroplasty complications Cement Leaks Without question, cement leaks account for most of the symptomatic complications resulting from PV ( 1 – 3 ). When treating osteoporotic compression fractures, symptomatic complications are expected less than 1% of the time. This increases to 2–5% when osteolytic metastatic disease is treated ( 1 ). In both clinical situations, the resultant complications are most often associated with cement leakage from the vertebra and its subsequent compression of adjacent neurologic structures or embolic effects on the lungs. Cement leaks may be seen in 5–15% of routine cases. These leaks are generally small and are usually of no clinical consequence ( Fig 1 ). This is the case regardless of the location of the leak. In healthy individuals, the lungs will tolerate small emboli without symptoms ( Fig 2 ). A large cement leak, however, can cause a pulmonary infarct and multiple emboli may lead to pulmonary compromise or even http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: Complication Avoidance and Technique Optimization

American Journal of Neuroradiology, Volume 24 (8): 1697 – Sep 1, 2003

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by the American Society of Neuroradiology.
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Fortunately, complications with PV (Table 1) have been for the most part uncommon. Awareness of the potential for complications and attention to detail will allow one to avoid these in most circumstances. View this table: In this window In a new window TABLE 1: Vertebroplasty complications Cement Leaks Without question, cement leaks account for most of the symptomatic complications resulting from PV ( 1 – 3 ). When treating osteoporotic compression fractures, symptomatic complications are expected less than 1% of the time. This increases to 2–5% when osteolytic metastatic disease is treated ( 1 ). In both clinical situations, the resultant complications are most often associated with cement leakage from the vertebra and its subsequent compression of adjacent neurologic structures or embolic effects on the lungs. Cement leaks may be seen in 5–15% of routine cases. These leaks are generally small and are usually of no clinical consequence ( Fig 1 ). This is the case regardless of the location of the leak. In healthy individuals, the lungs will tolerate small emboli without symptoms ( Fig 2 ). A large cement leak, however, can cause a pulmonary infarct and multiple emboli may lead to pulmonary compromise or even

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Sep 1, 2003

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