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Operative Techniques in Epilepsy Surgery

Operative Techniques in Epilepsy Surgery Operative Techniques in Epilepsy Surgery var callbackToken='4734E16B2E38B7B'; American Journal of Neuroradiology Skip to main page content Home Current Issue Publication Preview Search the AJNR Archives Interventional Neuroradiology Neurographics Help Search for Keyword: GO Advanced Search Institution: Deep Dyve User Name Password Sign In Book Review <h2>Operative Techniques in Epilepsy Surgery</h2> G.H. Baltuch a and J.-G. Villemure a a Thieme; 2009, 216 pages, 7 tables, 138 illustrations, $149.95. Surgical treatment of epilepsy has been a treatment option for intractable epilepsy for many years. With improvements in anatomic and functional imaging modalities, stereotaxy, and the integration of neuronavigation during surgery, epilepsy surgery has entered a new era of expertise. In this context, the present text provides a very comprehensive review of various epileptic syndromes and aspects of surgical management of patients with intractable epilepsy. Operative Techniques in Epilepsy Surgery is a unique compilation of chapters discussing various diagnostic and technical aspects of epilepsy surgery. These chapters discuss the role of image guidance in the facilitation of precise placement of subdural grid, strip, and depth electrodes to localize the onset of the seizure. Coregistration techniques have helped in precisely localizing the eloquent cortex and its relationship with seizure onset, especially in patients with nonlesional epilepsy. These technologies have been carried into the operating room, where neuronavigation has helped to localize brain areas during surgery. Image guidance has also enhanced our understanding of the pathologic substrate responsible for persistent seizures and outlined the anatomic correlates of temporal lobectomy, hemispherectomy, and corpus colostomy. The authors also discuss the surgical principles outlining the role of chronic invasive extraoperative recording. The section on cortical resection reviews the work-up of epilepsy arising in various cortical regions and their surgical management. The reviews are comprehensive and very thoroughly researched. They are a tremendous aid to the residents who are starting to learn the techniques of surgical resections for epilepsy. The chapters on cortical resection in extratemporal sites highlight the difficulties associated with clinical localization on the basis of seizure semiology alone. Clinical symptoms may reflect the involvement of the cerebral cortex during the spread of the seizure discharge, rather than the precise area where seizures originate. Ictal single-photon emission CT changes may reflect the extent of cortical involvement in the seizure. Although this may not directly interest the generalist, it would be of great interest to the neuroradiologist to understand the issues involved in seizure semiology and precise seizure localization. Neuroradiologists who understand these concepts can better help neurologists and neurosurgeons identify structural abnormalities in the brain. The chapters on insular epilepsy and hypothalamic hamartomas are very well written. Insular epilepsy is a relatively under-recognized form of intractable epilepsy. Many of the clinical presentations reflect spread of epileptic discharges to the amygdala, entorhinal cortex, and pyriform cortex or the sensorimotor cortex. The discussion on hypothalamic hamartomas is exhaustive and very informative. The book includes discussions of the use of brain stimulators to control epilepsy. These are relatively new technologies that have allowed the use of surgical interventions to control seizures in patients who may have bilateral mesial temporal epilepsy and may have seizure onset in the eloquent cortex. Such patients are not, otherwise, candidates for resective surgery. The authors explain the principles of open-loop continuous stimulation and closed-loop stimulation in response to specific EEG changes. The final section discusses the role of radiosurgery in the treatment of epilepsy associated with arteriovenous malformations, hypothalamic hamartomas, and mesial temporal lobe pathologic conditions. Operative Techniques in Epilepsy Surgery is a very comprehensive text that discusses the principles and techniques of nonpharmacologic management of intractable epilepsy. All of the chapters are extremely well illustrated and help clarify the anatomic and surgical details. Understanding the anatomic basis of epilepsy surgery is essential to achieve a good surgical result and avoid complications. I believe this book will tremendously help residents and young attending physicians start their career in epilepsy surgery. This book provides superb background information regarding epilepsy surgery and all of its ramifications, which can be of help to radiologists who help manage patients with seizure disorders. Copyright © American Society of Neuroradiology CiteULike Complore Connotea Delicious Digg Google+ What's this? « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Published online before print June 9, 2009 , doi: 10.3174/ajnr.A1689 AJNR 2009 30: E133 » Full Text PDF Services Email this article to a colleague Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Download to citation manager Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Baltuch, G. Articles by Villemure, J. Search for related content PubMed Articles by Baltuch, G. Articles by Villemure, J. Related Content Load related web page information Social Bookmarking CiteULike Complore Connotea Delicious Digg Google+ What's this? Hotlight What's Hotlight? Current Issue Volume 32, Issue 9 Alert me to new issues of AJNR About AJNR Subscribe Author Info Submit Online Editorial Board Feedback E-mail Alerts Advertising RSS Home Subscribe Author Info Submit Online Feedback Help Copyright © 2011 by the American Society of Neuroradiology Print ISSN: 0195-6108 Online ISSN: 1936-959X http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

Operative Techniques in Epilepsy Surgery

American Journal of Neuroradiology , Volume 30 (9): E133 – Oct 1, 2009

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by the American Society of Neuroradiology.
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A1689
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Operative Techniques in Epilepsy Surgery var callbackToken='4734E16B2E38B7B'; American Journal of Neuroradiology Skip to main page content Home Current Issue Publication Preview Search the AJNR Archives Interventional Neuroradiology Neurographics Help Search for Keyword: GO Advanced Search Institution: Deep Dyve User Name Password Sign In Book Review <h2>Operative Techniques in Epilepsy Surgery</h2> G.H. Baltuch a and J.-G. Villemure a a Thieme; 2009, 216 pages, 7 tables, 138 illustrations, $149.95. Surgical treatment of epilepsy has been a treatment option for intractable epilepsy for many years. With improvements in anatomic and functional imaging modalities, stereotaxy, and the integration of neuronavigation during surgery, epilepsy surgery has entered a new era of expertise. In this context, the present text provides a very comprehensive review of various epileptic syndromes and aspects of surgical management of patients with intractable epilepsy. Operative Techniques in Epilepsy Surgery is a unique compilation of chapters discussing various diagnostic and technical aspects of epilepsy surgery. These chapters discuss the role of image guidance in the facilitation of precise placement of subdural grid, strip, and depth electrodes to localize the onset of the seizure. Coregistration techniques have helped in precisely localizing the eloquent cortex and its relationship with seizure onset, especially in patients with nonlesional epilepsy. These technologies have been carried into the operating room, where neuronavigation has helped to localize brain areas during surgery. Image guidance has also enhanced our understanding of the pathologic substrate responsible for persistent seizures and outlined the anatomic correlates of temporal lobectomy, hemispherectomy, and corpus colostomy. The authors also discuss the surgical principles outlining the role of chronic invasive extraoperative recording. The section on cortical resection reviews the work-up of epilepsy arising in various cortical regions and their surgical management. The reviews are comprehensive and very thoroughly researched. They are a tremendous aid to the residents who are starting to learn the techniques of surgical resections for epilepsy. The chapters on cortical resection in extratemporal sites highlight the difficulties associated with clinical localization on the basis of seizure semiology alone. Clinical symptoms may reflect the involvement of the cerebral cortex during the spread of the seizure discharge, rather than the precise area where seizures originate. Ictal single-photon emission CT changes may reflect the extent of cortical involvement in the seizure. Although this may not directly interest the generalist, it would be of great interest to the neuroradiologist to understand the issues involved in seizure semiology and precise seizure localization. Neuroradiologists who understand these concepts can better help neurologists and neurosurgeons identify structural abnormalities in the brain. The chapters on insular epilepsy and hypothalamic hamartomas are very well written. Insular epilepsy is a relatively under-recognized form of intractable epilepsy. Many of the clinical presentations reflect spread of epileptic discharges to the amygdala, entorhinal cortex, and pyriform cortex or the sensorimotor cortex. The discussion on hypothalamic hamartomas is exhaustive and very informative. The book includes discussions of the use of brain stimulators to control epilepsy. These are relatively new technologies that have allowed the use of surgical interventions to control seizures in patients who may have bilateral mesial temporal epilepsy and may have seizure onset in the eloquent cortex. Such patients are not, otherwise, candidates for resective surgery. The authors explain the principles of open-loop continuous stimulation and closed-loop stimulation in response to specific EEG changes. The final section discusses the role of radiosurgery in the treatment of epilepsy associated with arteriovenous malformations, hypothalamic hamartomas, and mesial temporal lobe pathologic conditions. Operative Techniques in Epilepsy Surgery is a very comprehensive text that discusses the principles and techniques of nonpharmacologic management of intractable epilepsy. All of the chapters are extremely well illustrated and help clarify the anatomic and surgical details. Understanding the anatomic basis of epilepsy surgery is essential to achieve a good surgical result and avoid complications. I believe this book will tremendously help residents and young attending physicians start their career in epilepsy surgery. This book provides superb background information regarding epilepsy surgery and all of its ramifications, which can be of help to radiologists who help manage patients with seizure disorders. Copyright © American Society of Neuroradiology CiteULike Complore Connotea Delicious Digg Google+ What's this? « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Published online before print June 9, 2009 , doi: 10.3174/ajnr.A1689 AJNR 2009 30: E133 » Full Text PDF Services Email this article to a colleague Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Download to citation manager Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Baltuch, G. Articles by Villemure, J. Search for related content PubMed Articles by Baltuch, G. Articles by Villemure, J. Related Content Load related web page information Social Bookmarking CiteULike Complore Connotea Delicious Digg Google+ What's this? Hotlight What's Hotlight? Current Issue Volume 32, Issue 9 Alert me to new issues of AJNR About AJNR Subscribe Author Info Submit Online Editorial Board Feedback E-mail Alerts Advertising RSS Home Subscribe Author Info Submit Online Feedback Help Copyright © 2011 by the American Society of Neuroradiology Print ISSN: 0195-6108 Online ISSN: 1936-959X

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Oct 1, 2009

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