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Endovascular Treatment of Peripheral Aneurysms of the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery

Endovascular Treatment of Peripheral Aneurysms of the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Peripheral aneurysms of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) are rare, and pre-existing literature concerning their endovascular treatment is limited. The purpose of this study was to assess the etiology and clinical characteristics of peripheral PICA aneurysms and to evaluate the angiographic and clinical results of the patients who underwent endovascular treatment for a peripheral PICA aneurysm in a single center. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve consecutive patients with 12 peripheral PICA aneurysms (10 ruptured) included in an internal data base were retrospectively reviewed. Posttreatment and follow-up angiograms were analyzed, and the clinical outcome was recorded. RESULTS: The etiology was dissection in 7 (58%) and unknown in 5 cases (42%). Three dissecting aneurysms reruptured before endovascular treatment, and another 3 demonstrated angiographic progress. Four aneurysms were treated by endosaccular coiling, 6 (all dissecting) by parent artery occlusion, and in 2 cases endovascular treatment failed. Angiographic outcome was complete aneurysm and/or parent artery occlusion in 9 cases and neck remnant in 1 case. One aneurysm needed retreatment at follow-up. One lethal procedural complication occurred, and transient ischemic symptoms appeared in 2 patients. The clinical outcome was good in 7 patients, whereas 3 patients, all poor clinical grade, died (1 for unrelated reasons). No rebleedings have occurred during the follow-up. CONCLUSION: In this series, most peripheral PICA aneurysms were secondary to arterial dissection. They were unstable with a high risk of rebleeding and a high mortality if not treated without delay. Endovascular treatment was effective in preventing rehemorrhage. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

Endovascular Treatment of Peripheral Aneurysms of the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by the American Society of Neuroradiology.
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A1218
pmid
18635613
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Peripheral aneurysms of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) are rare, and pre-existing literature concerning their endovascular treatment is limited. The purpose of this study was to assess the etiology and clinical characteristics of peripheral PICA aneurysms and to evaluate the angiographic and clinical results of the patients who underwent endovascular treatment for a peripheral PICA aneurysm in a single center. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve consecutive patients with 12 peripheral PICA aneurysms (10 ruptured) included in an internal data base were retrospectively reviewed. Posttreatment and follow-up angiograms were analyzed, and the clinical outcome was recorded. RESULTS: The etiology was dissection in 7 (58%) and unknown in 5 cases (42%). Three dissecting aneurysms reruptured before endovascular treatment, and another 3 demonstrated angiographic progress. Four aneurysms were treated by endosaccular coiling, 6 (all dissecting) by parent artery occlusion, and in 2 cases endovascular treatment failed. Angiographic outcome was complete aneurysm and/or parent artery occlusion in 9 cases and neck remnant in 1 case. One aneurysm needed retreatment at follow-up. One lethal procedural complication occurred, and transient ischemic symptoms appeared in 2 patients. The clinical outcome was good in 7 patients, whereas 3 patients, all poor clinical grade, died (1 for unrelated reasons). No rebleedings have occurred during the follow-up. CONCLUSION: In this series, most peripheral PICA aneurysms were secondary to arterial dissection. They were unstable with a high risk of rebleeding and a high mortality if not treated without delay. Endovascular treatment was effective in preventing rehemorrhage.

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Oct 1, 2008

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