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Editor's Nitpicking

Editor's Nitpicking M. Castillo, Editor-in-Chief For many editors, the "After Deadline" column of the New York Times is a must read. In this section, one finds a critique of language, usage, and style. In a similar fashion, I will try to address some language and punctuation mark usage that seems to often confuse our authors. In an era when most of our published articles come from non-native English language speakers, I have found that the items discussed below are often the source of confusion and misuse. "ie" versus "eg" No, "ie" does not mean Internet Explorer. In writing, ie is meant as an abbreviation for the Latin phrase id est . If you are not sure when to use ie, it is better to say "that is." Ie also means "in other words" or "it is." Ie is used to specify or make an expression more clear. Ie can be used to clarify a preceding statement by restating the idea. Although in the last sentences I have capitalized the expression (because it started the sentences), ie (as well as "eg") is more commonly found in the middle of sentences and does not need to be capitalized. "Ie" actually looks weird, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

Editor's Nitpicking

American Journal of Neuroradiology , Volume 31 (8): 1353 – Sep 1, 2010

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroradiology.
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A2046
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

M. Castillo, Editor-in-Chief For many editors, the "After Deadline" column of the New York Times is a must read. In this section, one finds a critique of language, usage, and style. In a similar fashion, I will try to address some language and punctuation mark usage that seems to often confuse our authors. In an era when most of our published articles come from non-native English language speakers, I have found that the items discussed below are often the source of confusion and misuse. "ie" versus "eg" No, "ie" does not mean Internet Explorer. In writing, ie is meant as an abbreviation for the Latin phrase id est . If you are not sure when to use ie, it is better to say "that is." Ie also means "in other words" or "it is." Ie is used to specify or make an expression more clear. Ie can be used to clarify a preceding statement by restating the idea. Although in the last sentences I have capitalized the expression (because it started the sentences), ie (as well as "eg") is more commonly found in the middle of sentences and does not need to be capitalized. "Ie" actually looks weird,

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Sep 1, 2010

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