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Congenital Brain Anomalies

Congenital Brain Anomalies Congenital Brain Anomalies var callbackToken='473688994BF1070'; American Journal of Neuroradiology Skip to main page content Home Current Issue Publication Preview Search the AJNR Archives Interventional Neuroradiology Neurographics Help Search for Keyword: GO Advanced Search Institution: Deep Dyve User Name Password Sign In Introduction <h2>Congenital Brain Anomalies</h2> T.A.G.M. Huisman a and A. Poretti a a Division of Pediatric Radiology Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiologic Science The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore, Maryland The significant and continuous development of the various neuroimaging techniques (especially of MR imaging) has revolutionized the analysis and understanding of multiple congenital brain anomalies over the last decade. The number and complexity of recognized congenital brain anomalies have steadily increased and, based upon the detailed neuroimaging findings, a “pattern-recognition approach” has emerged. Multiple “new classifications” have been proposed based upon neuroimaging findings. Increasing image detail and including earlier imaging (fetal MR imaging), allowed us not only to refine or correct diagnosis but also to recognize different phenotypes that may exist within 1 group of malformations. Identification of various subgroups in so-called well-defined malformations or recognition of overlapping features between malformations that initially were believed to belong to different categories of malformations have guided genetic analysis and resulted in the identification of causative genes. Moreover, advanced neuroimaging techniques, eg, diffusion tensor imaging, allow us to better study and understand the inner neuro-architecture of the normally and abnormally developing brain. This information may again help to better categorize various brain malformations that may look similar on conventional imaging but may have different etiologies. Finally, correlating various functional neuroimaging techniques, eg, diffusion-tensor imaging with connectivity MR imaging or functional, event-related MR imaging (fMRI), helps to unravel the complex functional/anatomic relation between various, distant functional centers within a malformed brain. For a better and complete understanding of brain malformations, a multi-disciplinary approach is mandatory, involving experts from neuro-embryology, neuro-genetics, neuro-chemistry, pediatric neurology and, last but not least, pediatric neuroradiology. The significance of an interdisciplinary approach is also reflected by the specialty training of the 2 guest editors of this Special Collection, who combine pediatric neuroradiology (T.H.) with pediatric neurology (A.P.). We are thankful to Mauricio Castillo, Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Neuroradiology ( AJNR ) for inviting us to be guest editors for this AJNR Special Collection about congenital brain anomalies. It was a great pleasure for us to review hundreds of articles about this topic published in the AJNR over the last 22 years (1990–2011). We selected articles based upon their academic and clinical innovative value for the better identification and understanding of congenital brain anomalies; second, articles were selected based on the primary brain region affected by the malformation (supra- versus infratentorial). In addition, we also took care that we included significant articles that used and discussed the various anatomic and advanced neuroimaging techniques. Multiple malformations are covered, including midline malformations: disorders of proliferation, migration, or cortical architecture, and hamartous disorders. In addition, we also selected articles focusing on disruptive lesions. Multiple MR techniques are represented in our selection (conventional MR, n = 23, diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging, n = 5, MR spectroscopy, n = 3, perfusion-weighted imaging, n = 1, and fetal MR, n = 5). We included a total of 37 articles (35 original and 2 review articles) from 5 different continents and 13 different countries. You will not be surprised that a significant number of the selected articles originate from 1 of the largest Northern American centers that focuses on brain malformation (Department of Neuroradiology, University of California, San Francisco). We hope that this selection of articles might be of interest to all people who deal with brain malformations either on an occasional or frequent basis, but also that this collection further strengthens and stimulates an interdisciplinary effort to unravel the mystery of brain malformations. © 2011 by American Journal of Neuroradiology CiteULike Connotea Delicious Digg Google+ What's this? « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article doi: 10.3174/ajnr.A2861 AJNR 2011 32: S3 » Full Text PDF Services Email this article to a colleague Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Web of Science Google Scholar Articles by Huisman, T. Articles by Poretti, A. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Huisman, T. Articles by Poretti, A. Related Content Load related web page information Social Bookmarking CiteULike Connotea Delicious Digg Google+ What's this? Hotlight What's Hotlight? Current Issue Volume 32, Issue 11 Alert me to new issues of AJNR About AJNR Subscribe Author Info Submit Online Editorial Board Feedback E-mail Alerts Advertising RSS Home Subscribe Author Info Submit Online Feedback Help Copyright © 2011 by the American Society of Neuroradiology Print ISSN: 0195-6108 Online ISSN: 1936-959X http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

Congenital Brain Anomalies

American Journal of Neuroradiology , Volume 32 (10 suppl): S3 – Oct 1, 2011

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by the American Society of Neuroradiology.
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A2861
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Congenital Brain Anomalies var callbackToken='473688994BF1070'; American Journal of Neuroradiology Skip to main page content Home Current Issue Publication Preview Search the AJNR Archives Interventional Neuroradiology Neurographics Help Search for Keyword: GO Advanced Search Institution: Deep Dyve User Name Password Sign In Introduction <h2>Congenital Brain Anomalies</h2> T.A.G.M. Huisman a and A. Poretti a a Division of Pediatric Radiology Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiologic Science The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore, Maryland The significant and continuous development of the various neuroimaging techniques (especially of MR imaging) has revolutionized the analysis and understanding of multiple congenital brain anomalies over the last decade. The number and complexity of recognized congenital brain anomalies have steadily increased and, based upon the detailed neuroimaging findings, a “pattern-recognition approach” has emerged. Multiple “new classifications” have been proposed based upon neuroimaging findings. Increasing image detail and including earlier imaging (fetal MR imaging), allowed us not only to refine or correct diagnosis but also to recognize different phenotypes that may exist within 1 group of malformations. Identification of various subgroups in so-called well-defined malformations or recognition of overlapping features between malformations that initially were believed to belong to different categories of malformations have guided genetic analysis and resulted in the identification of causative genes. Moreover, advanced neuroimaging techniques, eg, diffusion tensor imaging, allow us to better study and understand the inner neuro-architecture of the normally and abnormally developing brain. This information may again help to better categorize various brain malformations that may look similar on conventional imaging but may have different etiologies. Finally, correlating various functional neuroimaging techniques, eg, diffusion-tensor imaging with connectivity MR imaging or functional, event-related MR imaging (fMRI), helps to unravel the complex functional/anatomic relation between various, distant functional centers within a malformed brain. For a better and complete understanding of brain malformations, a multi-disciplinary approach is mandatory, involving experts from neuro-embryology, neuro-genetics, neuro-chemistry, pediatric neurology and, last but not least, pediatric neuroradiology. The significance of an interdisciplinary approach is also reflected by the specialty training of the 2 guest editors of this Special Collection, who combine pediatric neuroradiology (T.H.) with pediatric neurology (A.P.). We are thankful to Mauricio Castillo, Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Neuroradiology ( AJNR ) for inviting us to be guest editors for this AJNR Special Collection about congenital brain anomalies. It was a great pleasure for us to review hundreds of articles about this topic published in the AJNR over the last 22 years (1990–2011). We selected articles based upon their academic and clinical innovative value for the better identification and understanding of congenital brain anomalies; second, articles were selected based on the primary brain region affected by the malformation (supra- versus infratentorial). In addition, we also took care that we included significant articles that used and discussed the various anatomic and advanced neuroimaging techniques. Multiple malformations are covered, including midline malformations: disorders of proliferation, migration, or cortical architecture, and hamartous disorders. In addition, we also selected articles focusing on disruptive lesions. Multiple MR techniques are represented in our selection (conventional MR, n = 23, diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging, n = 5, MR spectroscopy, n = 3, perfusion-weighted imaging, n = 1, and fetal MR, n = 5). We included a total of 37 articles (35 original and 2 review articles) from 5 different continents and 13 different countries. You will not be surprised that a significant number of the selected articles originate from 1 of the largest Northern American centers that focuses on brain malformation (Department of Neuroradiology, University of California, San Francisco). We hope that this selection of articles might be of interest to all people who deal with brain malformations either on an occasional or frequent basis, but also that this collection further strengthens and stimulates an interdisciplinary effort to unravel the mystery of brain malformations. © 2011 by American Journal of Neuroradiology CiteULike Connotea Delicious Digg Google+ What's this? « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article doi: 10.3174/ajnr.A2861 AJNR 2011 32: S3 » Full Text PDF Services Email this article to a colleague Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Web of Science Google Scholar Articles by Huisman, T. Articles by Poretti, A. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Huisman, T. Articles by Poretti, A. Related Content Load related web page information Social Bookmarking CiteULike Connotea Delicious Digg Google+ What's this? Hotlight What's Hotlight? Current Issue Volume 32, Issue 11 Alert me to new issues of AJNR About AJNR Subscribe Author Info Submit Online Editorial Board Feedback E-mail Alerts Advertising RSS Home Subscribe Author Info Submit Online Feedback Help Copyright © 2011 by the American Society of Neuroradiology Print ISSN: 0195-6108 Online ISSN: 1936-959X

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Oct 1, 2011

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