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Coils and Cash: What Coil Vendors Don't Want You to Know

Coils and Cash: What Coil Vendors Don't Want You to Know H.J. Cloft, Senior Editor My problem lies in reconciling my gross habits with my net income. Errol Flynn Until the introduction of coils by Micrus (San Jose, Calif) to the market in 2000, Boston Scientific (Natick, Mass) had a detachable coil monopoly. Since then, Cordis (Miami Lakes, Fla), MicroVention (Alisa Viejo, Calif), ev3 (Irvine, Calif), and Cook (Bloomington, Ind) have entered the market. Despite a large increase in competition in the marketplace, detachable coil prices have continued to rise. Perhaps the single largest contributor to coil cost escalation is that physicians are generally not sensitive to device pricing because their salary and resources have not been directly related to hospital costs. Physicians thus have tended to choose coils with little regard to cost. We now have coils on the market ranging in list price from $500 to $3000. Many diseases can be treated with a single device, such as an arterial stenosis, which is treated with a single stent. However, cerebral aneurysms are unusual in that we generally need several expensive coils to treat a single aneurysm, and adding a stent for cerebral aneurysm treatment, which costs $5200 to $5300 each, makes the coils look cheap. In a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

Coils and Cash: What Coil Vendors Don't Want You to Know

American Journal of Neuroradiology , Volume 30 (7): 1276 – Aug 1, 2009

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroradiology.
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A1638
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

H.J. Cloft, Senior Editor My problem lies in reconciling my gross habits with my net income. Errol Flynn Until the introduction of coils by Micrus (San Jose, Calif) to the market in 2000, Boston Scientific (Natick, Mass) had a detachable coil monopoly. Since then, Cordis (Miami Lakes, Fla), MicroVention (Alisa Viejo, Calif), ev3 (Irvine, Calif), and Cook (Bloomington, Ind) have entered the market. Despite a large increase in competition in the marketplace, detachable coil prices have continued to rise. Perhaps the single largest contributor to coil cost escalation is that physicians are generally not sensitive to device pricing because their salary and resources have not been directly related to hospital costs. Physicians thus have tended to choose coils with little regard to cost. We now have coils on the market ranging in list price from $500 to $3000. Many diseases can be treated with a single device, such as an arterial stenosis, which is treated with a single stent. However, cerebral aneurysms are unusual in that we generally need several expensive coils to treat a single aneurysm, and adding a stent for cerebral aneurysm treatment, which costs $5200 to $5300 each, makes the coils look cheap. In a

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Aug 1, 2009

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