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Coil Protection Using Small Helical Coils for Wide-Neck Intracranial Aneurysms: A Novel Approach

Coil Protection Using Small Helical Coils for Wide-Neck Intracranial Aneurysms: A Novel Approach BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A number of remodeling or protective techniques available to treat wide-neck intracranial aneurysms are increasingly being used, provided that the shape/type of aneurysm, vessel diameter, and inherent course of the vessel are conducive to their use. The purpose of this study was to describe a novel method using coil protection for treatment of wide-neck aneurysms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This technique involves sequential maneuvers to the aneurysm and affected branch artery. A microcatheter is first introduced into the aneurysmal sac, and another microcatheter is introduced into the entrance of the branch artery, followed by partial deployment of a small helical coil into the branch artery. A framing coil is then placed within the aneurysmal sac, under the protection of the helical coil. After completion of the first coil insertion, the helical coil should be retrieved to confirm the stability of the framing coil. The helical coil can also serve as a filler. RESULTS: This technique was successfully applied to 12 intracranial saccular aneurysms of the MCA bifurcation (5 patients); anterior communicating artery (3 patients); and A1 and M1 segments, distal ACA, and basilar tip (1 patient each). Selective endovascular treatment was successfully performed and resulted in excellent outcomes in all patients. There were no complications directly related to coil protection. CONCLUSIONS: Our small study suggests that coil protection can be a safe alternative to traditional remodeling or protective techniques when those techniques have failed or are not possible due to vascular geometry. It is particularly suited for the treatment of wide-neck aneurysms arising from small and acutely angulated branching vessels. ABBREVIATION: ACA anterior cerebral artery http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

Coil Protection Using Small Helical Coils for Wide-Neck Intracranial Aneurysms: A Novel Approach

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by the American Society of Neuroradiology.
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A3157
pmid
22700748
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A number of remodeling or protective techniques available to treat wide-neck intracranial aneurysms are increasingly being used, provided that the shape/type of aneurysm, vessel diameter, and inherent course of the vessel are conducive to their use. The purpose of this study was to describe a novel method using coil protection for treatment of wide-neck aneurysms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This technique involves sequential maneuvers to the aneurysm and affected branch artery. A microcatheter is first introduced into the aneurysmal sac, and another microcatheter is introduced into the entrance of the branch artery, followed by partial deployment of a small helical coil into the branch artery. A framing coil is then placed within the aneurysmal sac, under the protection of the helical coil. After completion of the first coil insertion, the helical coil should be retrieved to confirm the stability of the framing coil. The helical coil can also serve as a filler. RESULTS: This technique was successfully applied to 12 intracranial saccular aneurysms of the MCA bifurcation (5 patients); anterior communicating artery (3 patients); and A1 and M1 segments, distal ACA, and basilar tip (1 patient each). Selective endovascular treatment was successfully performed and resulted in excellent outcomes in all patients. There were no complications directly related to coil protection. CONCLUSIONS: Our small study suggests that coil protection can be a safe alternative to traditional remodeling or protective techniques when those techniques have failed or are not possible due to vascular geometry. It is particularly suited for the treatment of wide-neck aneurysms arising from small and acutely angulated branching vessels. ABBREVIATION: ACA anterior cerebral artery

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Jan 1, 2013

References