Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Citations and Open Access: Questionable Benefits

Citations and Open Access: Questionable Benefits M. Castillo, Editor-in-Chief Some of my recent editorials have dealt with the impact that open access (OA) has on the scientific and economic aspects of the American Journal of Neuroradiology ( AJNR ). As is well known, in addition to being a public service, OA allows greater dissemination of articles. In general, medical journals offer these types of access: Subscription access—articles only available to those who pay subscription fees. Selective (or partial) OA—selected articles, such as reviews or those funded by government monies, can be viewed immediately for free. Delayed OA—part of or all articles can be viewed for free after a period of time, generally 1–2 years. This type of access can be combined with selective OA; AJNR offers this type of combined access. Pay per view—anyone can view an article by paying a 1-time fee. OA—all articles are free immediately after publication. (A complete OA model was tried by the British Medical Journal [ BMJ ], but some years later it was modified to protect its subscription revenue.) An indirect and welcome effect of OA is that of increased citations that lead to a higher impact factor, thus increasing a journal's prestige. This is what is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

Citations and Open Access: Questionable Benefits

American Journal of Neuroradiology , Volume 30 (2): 215 – Feb 1, 2009

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-journal-of-neuroradiology/citations-and-open-access-questionable-benefits-QvzFCaEodJ
Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroradiology.
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A1325
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

M. Castillo, Editor-in-Chief Some of my recent editorials have dealt with the impact that open access (OA) has on the scientific and economic aspects of the American Journal of Neuroradiology ( AJNR ). As is well known, in addition to being a public service, OA allows greater dissemination of articles. In general, medical journals offer these types of access: Subscription access—articles only available to those who pay subscription fees. Selective (or partial) OA—selected articles, such as reviews or those funded by government monies, can be viewed immediately for free. Delayed OA—part of or all articles can be viewed for free after a period of time, generally 1–2 years. This type of access can be combined with selective OA; AJNR offers this type of combined access. Pay per view—anyone can view an article by paying a 1-time fee. OA—all articles are free immediately after publication. (A complete OA model was tried by the British Medical Journal [ BMJ ], but some years later it was modified to protect its subscription revenue.) An indirect and welcome effect of OA is that of increased citations that lead to a higher impact factor, thus increasing a journal's prestige. This is what is

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Feb 1, 2009

There are no references for this article.