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Can Assessment of the Tongue on Brain MRI Aid Differentiation of Seizure from Alternative Causes of Transient Loss of Consciousness?

Can Assessment of the Tongue on Brain MRI Aid Differentiation of Seizure from Alternative Causes... ORIGINAL RESEARCH HEAD & NECK Can Assessment of the Tongue on Brain MRI Aid Differentiation of Seizure from Alternative Causes of Transient Loss of Consciousness? J.A. Erickson, M.D. Benayoun, C.M. Lack, J.R. Sachs, and P.M. Bunch ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Transient loss of consciousness is commonly evaluated in the emergency department. Although typically caused by epileptic seizure, syncope, or psychogenic nonepileptic seizure, the underlying etiology is frequently mis- diagnosed. Lateral tongue bites are reportedly a specificclinical findingof seizure. Wehaveobserved tonguesignalabnormal- ity suggesting bite injury on brain MR imaging after seizures. We hypothesized an association between tongue signal abnormality and seizure diagnosis among patients in the emergency department imaged for transient loss of consciousness. Our purposes were to determine the prevalence of tongue signal abnormality among this population and the predictive per- formance for seizure diagnosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For this retrospective study including 82 brain MR imaging examinations, 2 readers independently assessed tongue signal abnormality on T2-weighted and T2-weighted FLAIR images. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus, and interrater reli- ability (Cohen k) was calculated. The final diagnosis was recorded. Proportions were compared using the Fisher exact test. RESULTS: Tongue signal abnormality was present on 19/82 (23%) MR imaging examinations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

Can Assessment of the Tongue on Brain MRI Aid Differentiation of Seizure from Alternative Causes of Transient Loss of Consciousness?

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
© 2021 by American Journal of Neuroradiology
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A7188
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL RESEARCH HEAD & NECK Can Assessment of the Tongue on Brain MRI Aid Differentiation of Seizure from Alternative Causes of Transient Loss of Consciousness? J.A. Erickson, M.D. Benayoun, C.M. Lack, J.R. Sachs, and P.M. Bunch ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Transient loss of consciousness is commonly evaluated in the emergency department. Although typically caused by epileptic seizure, syncope, or psychogenic nonepileptic seizure, the underlying etiology is frequently mis- diagnosed. Lateral tongue bites are reportedly a specificclinical findingof seizure. Wehaveobserved tonguesignalabnormal- ity suggesting bite injury on brain MR imaging after seizures. We hypothesized an association between tongue signal abnormality and seizure diagnosis among patients in the emergency department imaged for transient loss of consciousness. Our purposes were to determine the prevalence of tongue signal abnormality among this population and the predictive per- formance for seizure diagnosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For this retrospective study including 82 brain MR imaging examinations, 2 readers independently assessed tongue signal abnormality on T2-weighted and T2-weighted FLAIR images. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus, and interrater reli- ability (Cohen k) was calculated. The final diagnosis was recorded. Proportions were compared using the Fisher exact test. RESULTS: Tongue signal abnormality was present on 19/82 (23%) MR imaging examinations.

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Sep 1, 2021

References