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Buried Treasures: Unpublished Results of Industry-Sponsored Neurointerventional Trials

Buried Treasures: Unpublished Results of Industry-Sponsored Neurointerventional Trials Clinical trials are conducted to advance medical knowledge and thereby improve patient care. The results of clinical trials are generally published in the peer-reviewed medical literature, which provides physicians with easy access to this important information. Physicians can then assess the trial results themselves, decide how to incorporate them into patient care, and plan future research. It is through this peer-reviewed collection and dissemination of information that our collective medical knowledge advances. If trial results are not published in the peer-reviewed literature, then this process of advancing knowledge breaks down. We, therefore, find it disturbing when the results of industry-sponsored clinical trials of neurointerventional therapies are not published in the peer-reviewed literature. Industry sponsors have an inherent conflict of interest regarding publication of trial results. They will tend to encourage publication of favorable results and discourage publication of unfavorable results. This tendency is known as publication bias and has been well documented as a real phenomenon. 1 Unlike an industry sponsor, physicians and patients can benefit from access to all trial results, regardless of whether the results are favorable or unfavorable. If we are unable to access information from trials with unfavorable outcomes, then it is difficult to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Neuroradiology American Journal of Neuroradiology

Buried Treasures: Unpublished Results of Industry-Sponsored Neurointerventional Trials

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Publisher
American Journal of Neuroradiology
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroradiology.
ISSN
0195-6108
eISSN
1936-959X
DOI
10.3174/ajnr.A1599
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Clinical trials are conducted to advance medical knowledge and thereby improve patient care. The results of clinical trials are generally published in the peer-reviewed medical literature, which provides physicians with easy access to this important information. Physicians can then assess the trial results themselves, decide how to incorporate them into patient care, and plan future research. It is through this peer-reviewed collection and dissemination of information that our collective medical knowledge advances. If trial results are not published in the peer-reviewed literature, then this process of advancing knowledge breaks down. We, therefore, find it disturbing when the results of industry-sponsored clinical trials of neurointerventional therapies are not published in the peer-reviewed literature. Industry sponsors have an inherent conflict of interest regarding publication of trial results. They will tend to encourage publication of favorable results and discourage publication of unfavorable results. This tendency is known as publication bias and has been well documented as a real phenomenon. 1 Unlike an industry sponsor, physicians and patients can benefit from access to all trial results, regardless of whether the results are favorable or unfavorable. If we are unable to access information from trials with unfavorable outcomes, then it is difficult to

Journal

American Journal of NeuroradiologyAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology

Published: Sep 1, 2009

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