The Cave-Dwellers' Treasure: Folktales, Morality, and Gender in a Nahua Community in Mexico

The Cave-Dwellers' Treasure: Folktales, Morality, and Gender in a Nahua Community in Mexico In Nahua communities, both men and women may act as storytellers, but female storytellers are fewer and perform in more intimate contexts. As a result, there is to date no analysis of female Nahua storytelling. In this article, the author compares two cognate folktales and underlines how each storyteller, a woman and a man, deal with essential concepts related to morality and supernatural beings. Recent studies on women's folklore point out that women's discourse often takes place in a private context and uses ambiguity as an expressive strategy; this ambiguity, in turn, is linked to the immorality or illegitimacy attributed to women's words by many societies. The Nahua case, however, suggests that Nahua female storytellers, although performing privately, prefer a discourse that stresses themes of morality, while some publicly renowned male storytellers may express ambiguous and amoral feelings. Ultimately, this disparity can be tied to the ambivalent opinion Nahuas hold toward the Hispanic world and to recent changes in female identity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Folklore American Folklore Society

The Cave-Dwellers' Treasure: Folktales, Morality, and Gender in a Nahua Community in Mexico

Journal of American Folklore, Volume 120 (4) – Oct 18, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-folklore-society/the-cave-dwellers-treasure-folktales-morality-and-gender-in-a-nahua-O0rHQZWvGp
Publisher
American Folklore Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1535-1882
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In Nahua communities, both men and women may act as storytellers, but female storytellers are fewer and perform in more intimate contexts. As a result, there is to date no analysis of female Nahua storytelling. In this article, the author compares two cognate folktales and underlines how each storyteller, a woman and a man, deal with essential concepts related to morality and supernatural beings. Recent studies on women's folklore point out that women's discourse often takes place in a private context and uses ambiguity as an expressive strategy; this ambiguity, in turn, is linked to the immorality or illegitimacy attributed to women's words by many societies. The Nahua case, however, suggests that Nahua female storytellers, although performing privately, prefer a discourse that stresses themes of morality, while some publicly renowned male storytellers may express ambiguous and amoral feelings. Ultimately, this disparity can be tied to the ambivalent opinion Nahuas hold toward the Hispanic world and to recent changes in female identity.

Journal

Journal of American FolkloreAmerican Folklore Society

Published: Oct 18, 2007

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off