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The Bowie Knife: Unsheathing an American Legend (review)

The Bowie Knife: Unsheathing an American Legend (review) Book Reviews ing to go along with it, but others saw fiddling as an art form. campbell's writing is colorful and light on jargon. this book, a reworked dissertation, retains the virtues and flaws of the parent genre. Documentation--mostly quotations from Atlanta's newspapers of the era--is stunningly thorough and quite entertaining, but the tight focus characteristic of dissertation research allowed little comparison with how the social, racial, and gender tensions at the core of the book worked out elsewhere in the country. And the newspapers so meticulously mined for the book remain newspapers, with reporters' inclinations towards simplification and hyperbole in the service of entertaining while edifying. Still, all in all, this remains a fine book. being easy to read and not very long, it would make a nice entry in course syllabi. other scholars studying how the tensions that campbell explores for Atlanta were worked out elsewhere will find this book to be a ready partner. The Bowie Knife: Unsheathing an American Legend. by norm Flayderman. Fwd. by James S. hutchins. (lincoln, r.i.: Andrew mowbrey inc., 2004. Pp. 512, illustrations, bibliography, index.) Nathan E. Bender University of Idaho norm Flayderman's vast experience as an antique arms dealer http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Folklore American Folklore Society

The Bowie Knife: Unsheathing an American Legend (review)

Journal of American Folklore , Volume 120 (3) – Jul 26, 2007

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Publisher
American Folklore Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1535-1882
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews ing to go along with it, but others saw fiddling as an art form. campbell's writing is colorful and light on jargon. this book, a reworked dissertation, retains the virtues and flaws of the parent genre. Documentation--mostly quotations from Atlanta's newspapers of the era--is stunningly thorough and quite entertaining, but the tight focus characteristic of dissertation research allowed little comparison with how the social, racial, and gender tensions at the core of the book worked out elsewhere in the country. And the newspapers so meticulously mined for the book remain newspapers, with reporters' inclinations towards simplification and hyperbole in the service of entertaining while edifying. Still, all in all, this remains a fine book. being easy to read and not very long, it would make a nice entry in course syllabi. other scholars studying how the tensions that campbell explores for Atlanta were worked out elsewhere will find this book to be a ready partner. The Bowie Knife: Unsheathing an American Legend. by norm Flayderman. Fwd. by James S. hutchins. (lincoln, r.i.: Andrew mowbrey inc., 2004. Pp. 512, illustrations, bibliography, index.) Nathan E. Bender University of Idaho norm Flayderman's vast experience as an antique arms dealer

Journal

Journal of American FolkloreAmerican Folklore Society

Published: Jul 26, 2007

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