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The Art of Play: Recess and the Practice of Invention by Anna R. Beresin (review)

The Art of Play: Recess and the Practice of Invention by Anna R. Beresin (review) Book Reviews "notes" sections that appear at the end of each chapter. if readers do want to learn more, they will find small clips of annotated bibliographic information describing the major works that could be considered the heavy hitters of the field. While other textbooks might discuss taperecorded interviews, small forgotten things, and terrors in the night at length, this book references the complexities and nuances of the study of folklore without getting sidetracked. These sections provide just enough information for students to know where to place their next steps. the "notes" sections provide further clarification of terms, biographical information about notable folklorists and other scholars, and sometimes just entertaining parenthetical statements that uphold the entire book's conversational, enthusiastic tone. After recounting David hufford's work on the connection between what doctors term "sleep paralysis with hypnagogic hallucinations" and what folk belief might call "the old hag," mcneill adds this endnote: We should wonder why we assume that the medical phenomenon `explains' the traditional belief. . . . rather than saying that someone experiences the old hag because they have sleep paralysis with hypnagogic hallucinations, maybe people experience sleep paralysis with hypnagogic hallucinations because the old hag has come http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Folklore American Folklore Society

The Art of Play: Recess and the Practice of Invention by Anna R. Beresin (review)

Journal of American Folklore , Volume 128 (508) – Apr 26, 2015

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Publisher
American Folklore Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1535-1882
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews "notes" sections that appear at the end of each chapter. if readers do want to learn more, they will find small clips of annotated bibliographic information describing the major works that could be considered the heavy hitters of the field. While other textbooks might discuss taperecorded interviews, small forgotten things, and terrors in the night at length, this book references the complexities and nuances of the study of folklore without getting sidetracked. These sections provide just enough information for students to know where to place their next steps. the "notes" sections provide further clarification of terms, biographical information about notable folklorists and other scholars, and sometimes just entertaining parenthetical statements that uphold the entire book's conversational, enthusiastic tone. After recounting David hufford's work on the connection between what doctors term "sleep paralysis with hypnagogic hallucinations" and what folk belief might call "the old hag," mcneill adds this endnote: We should wonder why we assume that the medical phenomenon `explains' the traditional belief. . . . rather than saying that someone experiences the old hag because they have sleep paralysis with hypnagogic hallucinations, maybe people experience sleep paralysis with hypnagogic hallucinations because the old hag has come

Journal

Journal of American FolkloreAmerican Folklore Society

Published: Apr 26, 2015

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