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Religion and Folk Cosmology: Scenarios of the Visible and Invisible in Rural Egypt (review)

Religion and Folk Cosmology: Scenarios of the Visible and Invisible in Rural Egypt (review) Book Reviews the subjects of study by foreign field workers, and the sense of relative deprivation aroused in Spanish anthropology and folklore by the facilities and robust foundational support enjoyed by foreigners. Above all, in respect to oral narrative, the foreign presence led to a substitution of anthropological for folkloristic approaches. Also, much foreign work stated the obvious while missing many nuances of culture that were obvious to the native investigator. It would be a mistake for Anglo-American readers to assume that he or she has nothing to learn here because many of the topics treated in these essays have been matters of concern for several decades now in England and America. Like many Spaniards and other Europeans on the peripheries of what became the dynamic centers of social science inquiry in the late twentieth century--namely, Great Britain and the United States--Díaz obtains out of that very peripherality a special perceptiveness. Spanish anthropology and folkloristics have collaterally produced in the twentieth century a body of distinguished work, among which must figure the work of the author of these essays. Indeed, I know of no Anglo-American anthropologist who has his or her feet as firmly and informedly planted in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Folklore American Folklore Society

Religion and Folk Cosmology: Scenarios of the Visible and Invisible in Rural Egypt (review)

Journal of American Folklore , Volume 117 (464)

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Publisher
American Folklore Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1535-1882
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews the subjects of study by foreign field workers, and the sense of relative deprivation aroused in Spanish anthropology and folklore by the facilities and robust foundational support enjoyed by foreigners. Above all, in respect to oral narrative, the foreign presence led to a substitution of anthropological for folkloristic approaches. Also, much foreign work stated the obvious while missing many nuances of culture that were obvious to the native investigator. It would be a mistake for Anglo-American readers to assume that he or she has nothing to learn here because many of the topics treated in these essays have been matters of concern for several decades now in England and America. Like many Spaniards and other Europeans on the peripheries of what became the dynamic centers of social science inquiry in the late twentieth century--namely, Great Britain and the United States--Díaz obtains out of that very peripherality a special perceptiveness. Spanish anthropology and folkloristics have collaterally produced in the twentieth century a body of distinguished work, among which must figure the work of the author of these essays. Indeed, I know of no Anglo-American anthropologist who has his or her feet as firmly and informedly planted in

Journal

Journal of American FolkloreAmerican Folklore Society

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