Irish Traditional Music on Audio Recordings: A Core Historical Collection

Irish Traditional Music on Audio Recordings: A Core Historical Collection Irish Traditional Music on Audio Recordings: A Core Historical Collection Christopher J. Smith Vernacular Music Center, Texas Tech University School of Music The Tradition Recordings in the genres of "Irish traditional music," as they are conventionally understood in the twenty-first century, may be grouped according to several complementary taxonomies: stylistic, geographic, functional, and chronological. Like jazz, the music has been issued in various audio formats, essentially since the invention of sound recording, including wax cylinder, shellac disc, long-playing record, compact disc, and now in digital sound file form. With the exception of several relatively brief periods of commercial popularity--the "Golden Age" of the 1920s, the "Ballad Boom" of the 1960s, the "Folk Revival" of the late 1960s and 1970s, and the post-Riverdance (1994) and Titanic (1997) periods--the music has generally been recorded by and for aficionados interested in particular repertoires, stylists, dance functions, or nationalist imperatives.1 As a result, recordings of Irish traditional music are comparatively well documented and annotated, have often been compiled for comparatively disparate motives, and typically represent an unusually diverse and even "conventionally non-commercial" spectrum of styles. Publication of dance music and songs in the pre-recording era focused upon collecting and preservation in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Folklore American Folklore Society

Irish Traditional Music on Audio Recordings: A Core Historical Collection

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Publisher
American Folklore Society
Copyright
Copyright © the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1535-1882
Publisher site
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Abstract

Irish Traditional Music on Audio Recordings: A Core Historical Collection Christopher J. Smith Vernacular Music Center, Texas Tech University School of Music The Tradition Recordings in the genres of "Irish traditional music," as they are conventionally understood in the twenty-first century, may be grouped according to several complementary taxonomies: stylistic, geographic, functional, and chronological. Like jazz, the music has been issued in various audio formats, essentially since the invention of sound recording, including wax cylinder, shellac disc, long-playing record, compact disc, and now in digital sound file form. With the exception of several relatively brief periods of commercial popularity--the "Golden Age" of the 1920s, the "Ballad Boom" of the 1960s, the "Folk Revival" of the late 1960s and 1970s, and the post-Riverdance (1994) and Titanic (1997) periods--the music has generally been recorded by and for aficionados interested in particular repertoires, stylists, dance functions, or nationalist imperatives.1 As a result, recordings of Irish traditional music are comparatively well documented and annotated, have often been compiled for comparatively disparate motives, and typically represent an unusually diverse and even "conventionally non-commercial" spectrum of styles. Publication of dance music and songs in the pre-recording era focused upon collecting and preservation in the

Journal

Journal of American FolkloreAmerican Folklore Society

Published: Oct 4, 2012

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