Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Folksongs of Illinois #1 by Clark "Bucky" Halker and Nicole Saylor, and: Folksongs of Illinois #2 by Paul Tyler (review)

Folksongs of Illinois #1 by Clark "Bucky" Halker and Nicole Saylor, and: Folksongs of Illinois #2... Journal of American Folklore 126 (2013) idiomatic and personal form of the melody matches and departs from the fiddler's performance. martin will have fiddled alone sometimes, but in public performance settings, he was probably more often in duos or bands. When playing for dances but lacking amplification, fiddlers needed to be loud, especially if playing alone. one factor enhancing volume was (and remains) the use of cross-tunings (alternatives to the standard gDAe tuning of the open strings). martin used many such tunings, favoring common ones still used to lend resonance to the key of A; however, he tuned certain strings down, rather than tuning the others up, so was instead in g. cross-tunings offer the fiddler a number of advantages. They make playing in a given key easier, facilitate the use of double stops (two pitches played at once), and increase volume through sympathetic resonance. listening to this cD, the contrast between "Sandy river" (tuned gDgb) and the next track, "cumberland gap" (in standard tuning), is so striking that one almost gets the impression that one speaker of the stereo cut out. The disadvantage of cross-tunings is that fewer licks in those tunings seem graceful as compared to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Folklore American Folklore Society

Folksongs of Illinois #1 by Clark "Bucky" Halker and Nicole Saylor, and: Folksongs of Illinois #2 by Paul Tyler (review)

Journal of American Folklore , Volume 126 (500) – May 12, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-folklore-society/folksongs-of-illinois-1-by-clark-bucky-halker-and-nicole-saylor-and-iUkCcZV8TT
Publisher
American Folklore Society
Copyright
Copyright © the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
ISSN
1535-1882
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of American Folklore 126 (2013) idiomatic and personal form of the melody matches and departs from the fiddler's performance. martin will have fiddled alone sometimes, but in public performance settings, he was probably more often in duos or bands. When playing for dances but lacking amplification, fiddlers needed to be loud, especially if playing alone. one factor enhancing volume was (and remains) the use of cross-tunings (alternatives to the standard gDAe tuning of the open strings). martin used many such tunings, favoring common ones still used to lend resonance to the key of A; however, he tuned certain strings down, rather than tuning the others up, so was instead in g. cross-tunings offer the fiddler a number of advantages. They make playing in a given key easier, facilitate the use of double stops (two pitches played at once), and increase volume through sympathetic resonance. listening to this cD, the contrast between "Sandy river" (tuned gDgb) and the next track, "cumberland gap" (in standard tuning), is so striking that one almost gets the impression that one speaker of the stereo cut out. The disadvantage of cross-tunings is that fewer licks in those tunings seem graceful as compared to

Journal

Journal of American FolkloreAmerican Folklore Society

Published: May 12, 2013

There are no references for this article.