The Metabolic Syndrome: Requiescat in Pace

The Metabolic Syndrome: Requiescat in Pace Abstract Values for insulin-mediated glucose disposal vary continuously throughout a population of apparently healthy individuals, with at least a sixfold variation between the most insulin sensitive and most insulin resistant of these individuals. The more insulin resistant a person, the more insulin must be secreted to prevent decompensation of glucose tolerance. Insulin resistance is not a disease, but a description of a physiologic state, and approximately one third of an apparently healthy population is sufficiently insulin resistant to be at increased risk to develop a cluster of abnormalities and related clinical syndromes. The primary value of the concept of insulin resistance is that it provides a conceptual framework with which to place a substantial number of apparently unrelated biological events into a pathophysiological construct. In contrast, the metabolic syndrome was introduced as a diagnostic category to identify individuals that satisfy three of five relatively arbitrarily chosen criteria to initiate lifestyle changes with the goal of decreasing risk of cardiovascular disease. Consequently, the value of the notion of the metabolic syndrome must be considered not in pathophysiologic terms, but as a pragmatic approach to obtain a better clinical outcome. In this review, an effort is made to critically evaluate the concept of the metabolic syndrome, the criteria chosen to identify individuals with the syndrome, and the clinical utility of making, or not making, a diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome. © 2005 The American Association for Clinical Chemistry « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Published March 3, 2005. doi: 10.1373/clinchem.2005.048611 Clinical Chemistry June 2005 vol. 51 no. 6 931-938 » Abstract Full Text PDF All Versions of this Article: clinchem.2005.048611v1 51/6/931 most recent Classifications Review Services Email this article to a friend Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Responses No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Reaven, G. M. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Reaven, G. M. Related Collections Nutrition Evidence Based Laboratory Medicine and Test Utilization Heart Health and the Clinical Laboratory Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors Endocrinology and Metabolism Related Content Load related web page information Follow Us Clinical Chemistry Trainee Council Register Today! www.traineecouncil.org Information for Authors Submit a Manuscript Editorial Board Clinical Case Studies Clinical Chemistry Guide to Scientific Writing Journal Club Podcasts Translated Content Annual Meeting Abstracts Permissions and Reprints Advertising Copyright © 2012 by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Chemistry American Association for Clinical Chemistry

The Metabolic Syndrome: Requiescat in Pace

Clinical Chemistry, Volume 51 (6): 931 – Jun 1, 2005

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Publisher
American Association for Clinical Chemistry
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry.
ISSN
0009-9147
eISSN
1530-8561
D.O.I.
10.1373/clinchem.2005.048611
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Values for insulin-mediated glucose disposal vary continuously throughout a population of apparently healthy individuals, with at least a sixfold variation between the most insulin sensitive and most insulin resistant of these individuals. The more insulin resistant a person, the more insulin must be secreted to prevent decompensation of glucose tolerance. Insulin resistance is not a disease, but a description of a physiologic state, and approximately one third of an apparently healthy population is sufficiently insulin resistant to be at increased risk to develop a cluster of abnormalities and related clinical syndromes. The primary value of the concept of insulin resistance is that it provides a conceptual framework with which to place a substantial number of apparently unrelated biological events into a pathophysiological construct. In contrast, the metabolic syndrome was introduced as a diagnostic category to identify individuals that satisfy three of five relatively arbitrarily chosen criteria to initiate lifestyle changes with the goal of decreasing risk of cardiovascular disease. Consequently, the value of the notion of the metabolic syndrome must be considered not in pathophysiologic terms, but as a pragmatic approach to obtain a better clinical outcome. In this review, an effort is made to critically evaluate the concept of the metabolic syndrome, the criteria chosen to identify individuals with the syndrome, and the clinical utility of making, or not making, a diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome. © 2005 The American Association for Clinical Chemistry « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Published March 3, 2005. doi: 10.1373/clinchem.2005.048611 Clinical Chemistry June 2005 vol. 51 no. 6 931-938 » Abstract Full Text PDF All Versions of this Article: clinchem.2005.048611v1 51/6/931 most recent Classifications Review Services Email this article to a friend Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Responses No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Reaven, G. M. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Reaven, G. M. Related Collections Nutrition Evidence Based Laboratory Medicine and Test Utilization Heart Health and the Clinical Laboratory Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors Endocrinology and Metabolism Related Content Load related web page information Follow Us Clinical Chemistry Trainee Council Register Today! www.traineecouncil.org Information for Authors Submit a Manuscript Editorial Board Clinical Case Studies Clinical Chemistry Guide to Scientific Writing Journal Club Podcasts Translated Content Annual Meeting Abstracts Permissions and Reprints Advertising Copyright © 2012 by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry

Journal

Clinical ChemistryAmerican Association for Clinical Chemistry

Published: Jun 1, 2005

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