Simultaneous Analysis of Nicotine, Nicotine Metabolites, and Tobacco Alkaloids in Serum or Urine by Tandem Mass Spectrometry, with Clinically Relevant Metabolic Profiles

Simultaneous Analysis of Nicotine, Nicotine Metabolites, and Tobacco Alkaloids in Serum or Urine... Abstract Background: Assessment of nicotine metabolism and disposition has become an integral part of nicotine dependency treatment programs. Serum nicotine concentrations or urine cotinine concentrations can be used to guide nicotine patch dose to achieve biological concentrations adequate to provide the patient with immediate relief from nicotine withdrawal symptoms, an important factor in nicotine withdrawal success. Absence of nicotine metabolites and anabasine can be used to document abstinence from tobacco products, an indicator of treatment success. Methods: The procedure was designed to quantify nicotine, cotinine, trans -3′-hydroxycotinine, anabasine, and nornicotine in human serum or urine. The technique required simple extraction of the sample with quantification by HPLC–tandem mass spectrometry. Results: The procedure for simultaneous analysis of nicotine, its metabolites, and tobacco alkaloids simultaneously quantified five different analytes. Test limit of quantification, linearity, imprecision, and accuracy were adequate for clinical evaluation of patients undergoing treatment for tobacco dependency. The test readily distinguished individuals who had no exposure to tobacco products from individuals who were either passively exposed or were abstinent past-tobacco users from those who were actively using a tobacco or nicotine product. Conclusions: Nicotine, cotinine, trans -3′-hydroxycotinine, nornicotine, and anabasine can be simultaneously and accurately quantified in either serum or urine by HPLC–tandem mass spectrometry with imprecision <10% at physiologic concentrations and limits of quantification ranging from 0.5 to 5 μg/L. Knowledge of serum or urine concentrations of these analytes can be used to guide nicotine replacement therapy or to assess tobacco abstinence in nicotine dependency treatment. These measurements are now an integral part of the clinical treatment and management of patients who wish to overcome tobacco dependence. © 2002 The American Association for Clinical Chemistry « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Clinical Chemistry September 2002 vol. 48 no. 9 1460-1471 » Abstract Full Text PDF Classifications Drug Monitoring and Toxicology Services Email this article to a friend Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Responses No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Moyer, T. P. Articles by Hurt, R. D. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Moyer, T. P. Articles by Hurt, R. D. Related Collections Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors Drug Monitoring and Toxicology Automation and Analytical Techniques Related Content Load related web page information Follow Us Clinical Chemistry Trainee Council Register Today! www.traineecouncil.org Information for Authors Submit a Manuscript Editorial Board Clinical Case Studies Clinical Chemistry Guide to Scientific Writing Journal Club Podcasts Translated Content Annual Meeting Abstracts Permissions and Reprints Advertising Copyright © 2012 by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Chemistry American Association for Clinical Chemistry

Simultaneous Analysis of Nicotine, Nicotine Metabolites, and Tobacco Alkaloids in Serum or Urine by Tandem Mass Spectrometry, with Clinically Relevant Metabolic Profiles

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Publisher
American Association for Clinical Chemistry
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry.
ISSN
0009-9147
eISSN
1530-8561
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract Background: Assessment of nicotine metabolism and disposition has become an integral part of nicotine dependency treatment programs. Serum nicotine concentrations or urine cotinine concentrations can be used to guide nicotine patch dose to achieve biological concentrations adequate to provide the patient with immediate relief from nicotine withdrawal symptoms, an important factor in nicotine withdrawal success. Absence of nicotine metabolites and anabasine can be used to document abstinence from tobacco products, an indicator of treatment success. Methods: The procedure was designed to quantify nicotine, cotinine, trans -3′-hydroxycotinine, anabasine, and nornicotine in human serum or urine. The technique required simple extraction of the sample with quantification by HPLC–tandem mass spectrometry. Results: The procedure for simultaneous analysis of nicotine, its metabolites, and tobacco alkaloids simultaneously quantified five different analytes. Test limit of quantification, linearity, imprecision, and accuracy were adequate for clinical evaluation of patients undergoing treatment for tobacco dependency. The test readily distinguished individuals who had no exposure to tobacco products from individuals who were either passively exposed or were abstinent past-tobacco users from those who were actively using a tobacco or nicotine product. Conclusions: Nicotine, cotinine, trans -3′-hydroxycotinine, nornicotine, and anabasine can be simultaneously and accurately quantified in either serum or urine by HPLC–tandem mass spectrometry with imprecision <10% at physiologic concentrations and limits of quantification ranging from 0.5 to 5 μg/L. Knowledge of serum or urine concentrations of these analytes can be used to guide nicotine replacement therapy or to assess tobacco abstinence in nicotine dependency treatment. These measurements are now an integral part of the clinical treatment and management of patients who wish to overcome tobacco dependence. © 2002 The American Association for Clinical Chemistry « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Clinical Chemistry September 2002 vol. 48 no. 9 1460-1471 » Abstract Full Text PDF Classifications Drug Monitoring and Toxicology Services Email this article to a friend Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Responses No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Moyer, T. P. Articles by Hurt, R. D. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Moyer, T. P. Articles by Hurt, R. D. Related Collections Lipids, Lipoproteins, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors Drug Monitoring and Toxicology Automation and Analytical Techniques Related Content Load related web page information Follow Us Clinical Chemistry Trainee Council Register Today! www.traineecouncil.org Information for Authors Submit a Manuscript Editorial Board Clinical Case Studies Clinical Chemistry Guide to Scientific Writing Journal Club Podcasts Translated Content Annual Meeting Abstracts Permissions and Reprints Advertising Copyright © 2012 by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry

Journal

Clinical ChemistryAmerican Association for Clinical Chemistry

Published: Sep 1, 2002

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