Relationship of serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations to the excretion profiles of their major urinary metabolites as measured by enzyme immunoassay and radioimmunoassay.

Relationship of serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations to the excretion profiles of... Abstract Paired daily blood and urine samples were collected from 10 apparently healthy premenopausal women to compare the hormone profiles of estradiol (E2) and progesterone in serum with those of estrone conjugates (E1Conj) and pregnanediol-3-glucuronide (PdG) in urine. Serum hormones were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) kits, whereas the urinary steroid metabolites were assessed by both RIA and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). RIA and EIA values for urinary E1Conj and PdG were not different, and both methods produced urinary profiles that paralleled the profile of the parent steroid in serum. However, the simplicity, flexibility, and economy of EIA will make this method more widely applicable. Mean E1Conj values lagged behind concentrations of serum E2 by one day or less, whereas daily urinary PdG profiles lagged behind serum progesterone by one to two days. Mean urinary profiles of E1Conj were similar whether or not creatinine was used to adjust for urine volume; however, creatinine indexing was beneficial when urinary profiles in individual cycles were compared with changes of serum E2. © 1991 The American Association for Clinical Chemistry « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Clinical Chemistry June 1991 vol. 37 no. 6 838-844 » Abstract PDF Services Email this article to a friend Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Responses No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Munro, C. J. Articles by Lasley, B. L. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Munro, C. J. Articles by Lasley, B. L. Related Content Load related web page information Follow Us Clinical Chemistry Trainee Council Register Today! www.traineecouncil.org Information for Authors Submit a Manuscript Editorial Board Clinical Case Studies Clinical Chemistry Guide to Scientific Writing Journal Club Podcasts Translated Content Annual Meeting Abstracts Permissions and Reprints Advertising Copyright © 2012 by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Chemistry American Association for Clinical Chemistry

Relationship of serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations to the excretion profiles of their major urinary metabolites as measured by enzyme immunoassay and radioimmunoassay.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-association-for-clinical-chemistry/relationship-of-serum-estradiol-and-progesterone-concentrations-to-the-QUEUGTbVeX
Publisher
American Association for Clinical Chemistry
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry.
ISSN
0009-9147
eISSN
1530-8561
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Paired daily blood and urine samples were collected from 10 apparently healthy premenopausal women to compare the hormone profiles of estradiol (E2) and progesterone in serum with those of estrone conjugates (E1Conj) and pregnanediol-3-glucuronide (PdG) in urine. Serum hormones were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) kits, whereas the urinary steroid metabolites were assessed by both RIA and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). RIA and EIA values for urinary E1Conj and PdG were not different, and both methods produced urinary profiles that paralleled the profile of the parent steroid in serum. However, the simplicity, flexibility, and economy of EIA will make this method more widely applicable. Mean E1Conj values lagged behind concentrations of serum E2 by one day or less, whereas daily urinary PdG profiles lagged behind serum progesterone by one to two days. Mean urinary profiles of E1Conj were similar whether or not creatinine was used to adjust for urine volume; however, creatinine indexing was beneficial when urinary profiles in individual cycles were compared with changes of serum E2. © 1991 The American Association for Clinical Chemistry « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Clinical Chemistry June 1991 vol. 37 no. 6 838-844 » Abstract PDF Services Email this article to a friend Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Responses No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Munro, C. J. Articles by Lasley, B. L. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Munro, C. J. Articles by Lasley, B. L. Related Content Load related web page information Follow Us Clinical Chemistry Trainee Council Register Today! www.traineecouncil.org Information for Authors Submit a Manuscript Editorial Board Clinical Case Studies Clinical Chemistry Guide to Scientific Writing Journal Club Podcasts Translated Content Annual Meeting Abstracts Permissions and Reprints Advertising Copyright © 2012 by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry

Journal

Clinical ChemistryAmerican Association for Clinical Chemistry

Published: Jun 1, 1991

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off