National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for Use of Tumor Markers in Testicular, Prostate, Colorectal, Breast, and Ovarian Cancers

National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for Use of... Abstract Background: Updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the use of tumor markers in the clinic have been developed. Methods: Published reports relevant to use of tumor markers for 5 cancer sites—testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast, and ovarian—were critically reviewed. Results: For testicular cancer, α-fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, and lactate dehydrogenase are recommended for diagnosis/case finding, staging, prognosis determination, recurrence detection, and therapy monitoring. α-Fetoprotein is also recommended for differential diagnosis of nonseminomatous and seminomatous germ cell tumors. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is not recommended for prostate cancer screening, but may be used for detecting disease recurrence and monitoring therapy. Free PSA measurement data are useful for distinguishing malignant from benign prostatic disease when total PSA is <10 μg/L. In colorectal cancer, carcinoembryonic antigen is recommended (with some caveats) for prognosis determination, postoperative surveillance, and therapy monitoring in advanced disease. Fecal occult blood testing may be used for screening asymptomatic adults 50 years or older. For breast cancer, estrogen and progesterone receptors are mandatory for predicting response to hormone therapy, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 measurement is mandatory for predicting response to trastuzumab, and urokinase plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 may be used for determining prognosis in lymph node–negative patients. CA15-3/BR27–29 or carcinoembryonic antigen may be used for therapy monitoring in advanced disease. CA125 is recommended (with transvaginal ultrasound) for early detection of ovarian cancer in women at high risk for this disease. CA125 is also recommended for differential diagnosis of suspicious pelvic masses in postmenopausal women, as well as for detection of recurrence, monitoring of therapy, and determination of prognosis in women with ovarian cancer. Conclusions: Implementation of these recommendations should encourage optimal use of tumor markers. © 2008 The American Association for Clinical Chemistry « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article doi: 10.1373/clinchem.2008.105601 Clinical Chemistry December 2008 vol. 54 no. 12 e11-e79 » Abstract Full Text PDF Supplemental Data Classifications Special Report Services Email this article to a friend Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Responses No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Sturgeon, C. M. Articles by Diamandis, E. P. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Sturgeon, C. M. Articles by Diamandis, E. P. Related Content Load related web page information Follow Us Clinical Chemistry Trainee Council Register Today! www.traineecouncil.org Information for Authors Submit a Manuscript Editorial Board Clinical Case Studies Clinical Chemistry Guide to Scientific Writing Journal Club Podcasts Translated Content Annual Meeting Abstracts Permissions and Reprints Advertising Copyright © 2012 by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Chemistry American Association for Clinical Chemistry

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Publisher
American Association for Clinical Chemistry
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry.
ISSN
0009-9147
eISSN
1530-8561
DOI
10.1373/clinchem.2008.105601
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Background: Updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the use of tumor markers in the clinic have been developed. Methods: Published reports relevant to use of tumor markers for 5 cancer sites—testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast, and ovarian—were critically reviewed. Results: For testicular cancer, α-fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, and lactate dehydrogenase are recommended for diagnosis/case finding, staging, prognosis determination, recurrence detection, and therapy monitoring. α-Fetoprotein is also recommended for differential diagnosis of nonseminomatous and seminomatous germ cell tumors. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is not recommended for prostate cancer screening, but may be used for detecting disease recurrence and monitoring therapy. Free PSA measurement data are useful for distinguishing malignant from benign prostatic disease when total PSA is <10 μg/L. In colorectal cancer, carcinoembryonic antigen is recommended (with some caveats) for prognosis determination, postoperative surveillance, and therapy monitoring in advanced disease. Fecal occult blood testing may be used for screening asymptomatic adults 50 years or older. For breast cancer, estrogen and progesterone receptors are mandatory for predicting response to hormone therapy, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 measurement is mandatory for predicting response to trastuzumab, and urokinase plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 may be used for determining prognosis in lymph node–negative patients. CA15-3/BR27–29 or carcinoembryonic antigen may be used for therapy monitoring in advanced disease. CA125 is recommended (with transvaginal ultrasound) for early detection of ovarian cancer in women at high risk for this disease. CA125 is also recommended for differential diagnosis of suspicious pelvic masses in postmenopausal women, as well as for detection of recurrence, monitoring of therapy, and determination of prognosis in women with ovarian cancer. Conclusions: Implementation of these recommendations should encourage optimal use of tumor markers. © 2008 The American Association for Clinical Chemistry « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article doi: 10.1373/clinchem.2008.105601 Clinical Chemistry December 2008 vol. 54 no. 12 e11-e79 » Abstract Full Text PDF Supplemental Data Classifications Special Report Services Email this article to a friend Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Responses No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Sturgeon, C. M. Articles by Diamandis, E. P. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Sturgeon, C. M. Articles by Diamandis, E. P. Related Content Load related web page information Follow Us Clinical Chemistry Trainee Council Register Today! www.traineecouncil.org Information for Authors Submit a Manuscript Editorial Board Clinical Case Studies Clinical Chemistry Guide to Scientific Writing Journal Club Podcasts Translated Content Annual Meeting Abstracts Permissions and Reprints Advertising Copyright © 2012 by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry

Journal

Clinical ChemistryAmerican Association for Clinical Chemistry

Published: Dec 1, 2008

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