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METABOLISM OF 14CGEMOPATRILAT AFTER ORAL ADMINISTRATION TO RATS, DOGS, AND HUMANS

METABOLISM OF 14CGEMOPATRILAT AFTER ORAL ADMINISTRATION TO RATS, DOGS, AND HUMANS Abstract This study describes the pharmacokinetic parameters of gemopatrilat, a potent vasopeptidase inhibitor, in humans and the comparative biotransformation of the compound in rats, dogs, and humans after administration of a single oral dose of 14 Cgemopatrilat. Gemopatrilat was rapidly absorbed in humans with an oral bioavailability of 49%. Within 5 h after dose, the mean concentrations of gemopatrilat were less than 1% of the mean C max values. The total area under the first-moment time curve extrapolated to infinity AUC(INF) value for gemopatrilat was only 2% of the AUC(INF) of radioactivity in plasma. Gemopatrilat showed a large apparent steady-state volume of distribution (2500 liters) and a prolonged terminal-phase decline in plasma concentration. These results are consistent with the idea that the free sulfhydryl group of gemopatrilat forms reversible disulfide linkages with plasma and tissue proteins and is thus eliminated from the body at a very slow rate. Approximately half of the drug-related radioactivity in 1-h plasma samples from rat, dog, and human was reduced chemically with dithiothreitol to gemopatrilat, suggesting that disulfide linkage occurred in all species. In addition, metabolites formed through S -methylation and amide hydrolysis were also detected in rat, dog, and human plasma. No gemopatrilat was detected in urine and fecal samples from all three species, indicating that the compound is extensively metabolized in vivo. The major metabolites identified in human urine and feces were also present in rat and dog. These data suggest that the metabolism of gemopatrilat in all three species were qualitatively very similar. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Drug Metabolism and Disposition Am. Soc for Pharma & Experimental Therapeutics

METABOLISM OF 14CGEMOPATRILAT AFTER ORAL ADMINISTRATION TO RATS, DOGS, AND HUMANS

Abstract

Abstract This study describes the pharmacokinetic parameters of gemopatrilat, a potent vasopeptidase inhibitor, in humans and the comparative biotransformation of the compound in rats, dogs, and humans after administration of a single oral dose of 14 Cgemopatrilat. Gemopatrilat was rapidly absorbed in humans with an oral bioavailability of 49%. Within 5 h after dose, the mean concentrations of gemopatrilat were less than 1% of the mean C max values. The total area under the first-moment time curve extrapolated to infinity AUC(INF) value for gemopatrilat was only 2% of the AUC(INF) of radioactivity in plasma. Gemopatrilat showed a large apparent steady-state volume of distribution (2500 liters) and a prolonged terminal-phase decline in plasma concentration. These results are consistent with the idea that the free sulfhydryl group of gemopatrilat forms reversible disulfide linkages with plasma and tissue proteins and is thus eliminated from the body at a very slow rate. Approximately half of the drug-related radioactivity in 1-h plasma samples from rat, dog, and human was reduced chemically with dithiothreitol to gemopatrilat, suggesting that disulfide linkage occurred in all species. In addition, metabolites formed through S -methylation and amide hydrolysis were also detected in rat, dog, and human plasma. No gemopatrilat was detected in urine and fecal samples from all three species, indicating that the compound is extensively metabolized in vivo. The major metabolites identified in human urine and feces were also present in rat and dog. These data suggest that the metabolism of gemopatrilat in all three species were qualitatively very similar.
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