Blood Chemical Profiles and Symbiotic Relationships of Green Turtles (Chelonia mydas) Nesting in Campeche, Mexico

Blood Chemical Profiles and Symbiotic Relationships of Green Turtles (Chelonia mydas) Nesting in... AbstractAlthough the shores of Campeche, Mexico, are critical breeding grounds for the green turtle (Chelonia mydas), so far there is neither clinical nor ecological information about nesting females at this area; such information could help to improve conservation and management of this species. We describe the blood chemical profile based on 13 analytes, and the effect of prevalence of ectoparasites and epibionts of nesting female green turtles. Although we observed low atypical values for amylase and blood ureic nitrogen, and high atypical values for creatinine, phosphorus, and total bilirubin, these results are likely due to feeding habits and nesting-related stress and not to illness or parasitism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Chelonian Conservation and Biology Allen Press

Blood Chemical Profiles and Symbiotic Relationships of Green Turtles (Chelonia mydas) Nesting in Campeche, Mexico

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Publisher
Chelonian Research Foundation Terms and Conditions
Copyright
2018 Chelonian Research Foundation
ISSN
1071-8443
D.O.I.
10.2744/CCB-1288.1
Publisher site
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Abstract

AbstractAlthough the shores of Campeche, Mexico, are critical breeding grounds for the green turtle (Chelonia mydas), so far there is neither clinical nor ecological information about nesting females at this area; such information could help to improve conservation and management of this species. We describe the blood chemical profile based on 13 analytes, and the effect of prevalence of ectoparasites and epibionts of nesting female green turtles. Although we observed low atypical values for amylase and blood ureic nitrogen, and high atypical values for creatinine, phosphorus, and total bilirubin, these results are likely due to feeding habits and nesting-related stress and not to illness or parasitism.

Journal

Chelonian Conservation and BiologyAllen Press

Published: Jun 16, 2018

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