Knowledge Capital and Aggregate Income Differences: Development Accounting for US States†

Knowledge Capital and Aggregate Income Differences: Development Accounting for US States† AbstractImprovement in human capital is often presumed to be important for state economic development, but little research links better education to state incomes. We develop detailed measures of worker skills in each state that incorporate cognitive skills from state- and countryof-origin achievement tests. These new measures of knowledge capital permit development accounting analyses calibrated with standard production parameters. Differences in knowledge capital account for 20–30 percent of the state variation in per capita GDP, with roughly even contributions by school attainment and cognitive skills. Similar results emerge from growth accounting analyses. These estimates support school improvement as a strategy for state economic development. (JEL I25, I26, J24, R11, R23) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics American Economic Association

Knowledge Capital and Aggregate Income Differences: Development Accounting for US States†

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Publisher
American Economic Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 © American Economic Association
ISSN
1945-7715
D.O.I.
10.1257/mac.20160255
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractImprovement in human capital is often presumed to be important for state economic development, but little research links better education to state incomes. We develop detailed measures of worker skills in each state that incorporate cognitive skills from state- and countryof-origin achievement tests. These new measures of knowledge capital permit development accounting analyses calibrated with standard production parameters. Differences in knowledge capital account for 20–30 percent of the state variation in per capita GDP, with roughly even contributions by school attainment and cognitive skills. Similar results emerge from growth accounting analyses. These estimates support school improvement as a strategy for state economic development. (JEL I25, I26, J24, R11, R23)

Journal

American Economic Journal: MacroeconomicsAmerican Economic Association

Published: Oct 1, 2017

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