Book Reviews

Book Reviews AbstractJohn P. Caskey of Swarthmore College reviews “Feeling Smart: Why Our Emotions Are More Rational Than We Think,” by Eyal Winter. The Econlit abstract of this book begins: “Considers questions surrounding the relationships between emotions, rational behavior, and decision making. Discusses emotions as a mechanism for creating commitments; Stockholm syndrome and the story of the Nazi schoolteacher; emotional impostors, empathy, and the poker face; game theory, emotions, and the golden rule of ethics; the prisoners' dilemma in repeated interactions; decency, insult, and revenge; stigmas and games of trust; self-fulfilling mistrust; cultural differences, generosity, ethnocentrism, and trust; collective emotions and trauma; the handicap principle, the Ten Commandments, and other mechanisms for ensuring collective survival; knowing how to give and receive; the hormone that creates trust and neutralizes suspicion; men, women, and evolution—testing the myths; reproduction and the mathematics of romance; why evolution created art; the arithmetic of emotions; arrogance and humility; overconfidence and risk; sources of herd behavior; team spirit—the paradox of the generous bonuses and the lazy workers; irrational emotions; and nature or nurture—the source of rational emotions. Winter is Professor of Economics and Director of the Center for the Study of Rationality at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Economic Literature American Economic Association

Book Reviews

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Publisher
American Economic Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 © American Economic Association
ISSN
0022-0515
D.O.I.
10.1257/jel.55.4.1615.r2
Publisher site
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Abstract

AbstractJohn P. Caskey of Swarthmore College reviews “Feeling Smart: Why Our Emotions Are More Rational Than We Think,” by Eyal Winter. The Econlit abstract of this book begins: “Considers questions surrounding the relationships between emotions, rational behavior, and decision making. Discusses emotions as a mechanism for creating commitments; Stockholm syndrome and the story of the Nazi schoolteacher; emotional impostors, empathy, and the poker face; game theory, emotions, and the golden rule of ethics; the prisoners' dilemma in repeated interactions; decency, insult, and revenge; stigmas and games of trust; self-fulfilling mistrust; cultural differences, generosity, ethnocentrism, and trust; collective emotions and trauma; the handicap principle, the Ten Commandments, and other mechanisms for ensuring collective survival; knowing how to give and receive; the hormone that creates trust and neutralizes suspicion; men, women, and evolution—testing the myths; reproduction and the mathematics of romance; why evolution created art; the arithmetic of emotions; arrogance and humility; overconfidence and risk; sources of herd behavior; team spirit—the paradox of the generous bonuses and the lazy workers; irrational emotions; and nature or nurture—the source of rational emotions. Winter is Professor of Economics and Director of the Center for the Study of Rationality at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.”

Journal

Journal of Economic LiteratureAmerican Economic Association

Published: Dec 1, 2017

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