The virtual memory in the STRETCH computer

The virtual memory in the STRETCH computer 1959 PROCEEDINGS OF THE EASTERN JOINT COMPUTER CONFERENCE T h e Virtual Memory in the S T R E T C H Computer J O H N C O C K E AND H A R W O O D G. KOLSKYf ARLY in the planning of the STRETCH computer it was seen that by using the latest solid state components in sophisticated circuits it would be possible to increase the speed of floating point arithmetic by almost two orders of magnitude over that in existing computers. However, there seemed to be no possibility of developing on the same time-scale economically feasible large memories with more than a factor of ten or perhaps twenty increase in speed. As a result, the proposed system appeared to be in danger of being seriously memory-access limited. Moreover, as the speed of the floating point operations increases, a larger and larger percentage of the computer's time is spent on "parasitic operations", i.e., operations whose only function is program control and data selection. It was obvious that a radically new machine organization was necessary in order to capitalize upon the possibilities opened up by the high arithmetic speeds in the presence of relatively http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

The virtual memory in the STRETCH computer

Association for Computing Machinery — Dec 1, 1959

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Association for Computing Machinery
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Copyright © 1959 by ACM Inc.
D.O.I.
10.1145/1460299.1460308
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Abstract

1959 PROCEEDINGS OF THE EASTERN JOINT COMPUTER CONFERENCE T h e Virtual Memory in the S T R E T C H Computer J O H N C O C K E AND H A R W O O D G. KOLSKYf ARLY in the planning of the STRETCH computer it was seen that by using the latest solid state components in sophisticated circuits it would be possible to increase the speed of floating point arithmetic by almost two orders of magnitude over that in existing computers. However, there seemed to be no possibility of developing on the same time-scale economically feasible large memories with more than a factor of ten or perhaps twenty increase in speed. As a result, the proposed system appeared to be in danger of being seriously memory-access limited. Moreover, as the speed of the floating point operations increases, a larger and larger percentage of the computer's time is spent on "parasitic operations", i.e., operations whose only function is program control and data selection. It was obvious that a radically new machine organization was necessary in order to capitalize upon the possibilities opened up by the high arithmetic speeds in the presence of relatively

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