If you spoke as she does, sir, instead of the way you do: a sociolinguistics perspective of gender differences in virtual communities

If you spoke as she does, sir, instead of the way you do: a sociolinguistics perspective of... This study examines virtual community quality through sociolinguistics theory. According to sociolinguistics, in oral discourse men communicate to establish superior social standing, while women communicate with the undertone of rapport, compassion, and empathy. The study shows that these differences carry over to the asynchronous written environment of virtual communities and affect men's and women's respective perceptions of community quality. Women go to virtual communities to give and to get social support and have a more favorable assessment of the capability of others. This pattern generally holds even when comparing mostly single-gender communities and mixed-gender communities. However, a closer look at these differences reveals a more complex picture, with undertones in mixed-gender communities being less than in their respective mostly single-gender communities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM SIGMIS Database acm

If you spoke as she does, sir, instead of the way you do: a sociolinguistics perspective of gender differences in virtual communities

ACM SIGMIS Database, Volume 36 (2) – Jun 7, 2005

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Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
0095-0033
D.O.I.
10.1145/1066149.1066156
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examines virtual community quality through sociolinguistics theory. According to sociolinguistics, in oral discourse men communicate to establish superior social standing, while women communicate with the undertone of rapport, compassion, and empathy. The study shows that these differences carry over to the asynchronous written environment of virtual communities and affect men's and women's respective perceptions of community quality. Women go to virtual communities to give and to get social support and have a more favorable assessment of the capability of others. This pattern generally holds even when comparing mostly single-gender communities and mixed-gender communities. However, a closer look at these differences reveals a more complex picture, with undertones in mixed-gender communities being less than in their respective mostly single-gender communities.

Journal

ACM SIGMIS Databaseacm

Published: Jun 7, 2005

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