Using the Real-time Instructor Observing Tool (RIOT) for Reflection on Teaching Practice

Using the Real-time Instructor Observing Tool (RIOT) for Reflection on Teaching Practice As physics educators, we are constantly looking for ways to improve our practice. There are many different kinds of professional development opportunities that have been shown to help us with this endeavor. We can seek assistance from professionals, like mentor teachers or centers for faculty development, we can attend workshops to learn new curricula or pedagogical skills, and we can engage in learning communities to develop shared visions and become more reflective educators. However, when these activities end, what can we do on our own to continue to improve? How can we track our improvement? And perhaps even most importantly, what can we do when these resources aren’t available to us? While publications like The Physics Teacher offer excellent pedagogical practices we can try out in the classroom, how do we get feedback on what we decide to implement? http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Physics Teacher American Association of Physics Teachers

Using the Real-time Instructor Observing Tool (RIOT) for Reflection on Teaching Practice

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Publisher
American Association of Physics Teachers
Copyright
© American Association of Physicists in Medicine.
ISSN
0031-921X
D.O.I.
10.1119/1.5025286
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

As physics educators, we are constantly looking for ways to improve our practice. There are many different kinds of professional development opportunities that have been shown to help us with this endeavor. We can seek assistance from professionals, like mentor teachers or centers for faculty development, we can attend workshops to learn new curricula or pedagogical skills, and we can engage in learning communities to develop shared visions and become more reflective educators. However, when these activities end, what can we do on our own to continue to improve? How can we track our improvement? And perhaps even most importantly, what can we do when these resources aren’t available to us? While publications like The Physics Teacher offer excellent pedagogical practices we can try out in the classroom, how do we get feedback on what we decide to implement?

Journal

The Physics TeacherAmerican Association of Physics Teachers

Published: Mar 1, 2018

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