African American, Hispanic, and Native American women earning bachelor’s degrees in physical sciences

African American, Hispanic, and Native American women earning bachelor’s degrees in physical... ture undergraduate course,” J. Coll. Sci. Teach. 44 (4), 54–60 10. Colorado Upper Division Electrostatics (CUE) Assessment, (March/April 2015). http://www.colorado.edu/sei/departments/ 6. K. R. Green, T. Pinder-Grover, and J. M. Millunchick, “Im- physics_assessment.htm. pact of screencast technology: Connecting the perception of usefulness and the reality of performance,” J. Eng. Educ. 101, Nandana Weliweriya is a graduate student in physics at Kansas State 717–737 (Oct. 2012). University. He studies how undergraduate students make meaning in physics, particularly as they work on problems out loud and in groups. 7. S. A. Nonis and G. I. Hudson, “Performance of college stu- dents: Impact of study time and study habits,” J. Educ. Bus. 85 Eleanor Sayre is an associate professor of physics at Kansas State (4), 229–238 (2010). University and the research director at PhysPort. She conducts research 8. K. Clemmer, J. McCallum, J. Phillips, and T. Zachariah, “Im- on how students develop professional identity as scientists and how to proving students’ problem-solving competence with think- promote research-based teaching and assessment among physics faculty. alouds,” poster presented at the 2013 ISSOTL Conference (Oct. 2013). Dean Zollman is the director of the Center for Research and Innovation in 9. D. J. Griffiths, Introduction to Electrodynamics, 3rd ed. (Pren- STEM Education at Kansas State University and an emeritus distinguished professor of physics. His research spans curriculum development for tice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2007). teachers to graduate students as well as fundamental work in student understanding. Susan C. White, Column Editor American Institute of Physics And the Survey Says ... Statistical Research Center College Park, MD 20740; swhite@aip.org African American, Hispanic, and Native American women earning bachelor’s degrees in physical sciences etween 2003 and 2013, the total number of bach- Representation of African American, Hispanic, Belor’s degrees awarded in the United States grew by and Native American Women among 36% from 1.37 million to 1.86 million. During this same Bachelor’s Degree Recipients, 2003 and 2013 period, the number of bachelor’s degrees awarded to Af- All Degrees & Degrees in Physical Sciences rican American, Hispanic, and Native American women 14% grew by 65% from 146,495 to 240,987. Overall, the rep- resentation of these women among all bachelor’s degree 12% 2003 2013 recipients in the United States grew from 10.7% in 2003 to 10% 12.9% in 2013. These impressive gains are not mirrored in 8% the physical sciences. 6% We have compiled data on degree recipients in Earth 4% Sciences, Atmospheric Sciences, Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy, Oceanography, and Other Physical Sciences. 2% As seen in the figure, the overall representation of Afri- 0% can American, Hispanic, and Native American women All Bachelor's Degrees Bachelor's Degrees in Physical Sciences jumped between 2003 and 2013. However, their represen- Data from the National Center for Education Statistics compiled by SRC Staff tation among degree recipients in the physical sciences www.aip.org/statistics was virtually unchanged at 6%—or less than half of their representation among all degree recipients. Next month we will look at the representation of African American, Hispanic, and Native American women among degree re- cipients in engineering. Susan White is the Assistant Director of the Statistical Research Center at the American Institute of Physics; she can be reached at swhite@aip.org. Data resources are available at www.aip.org/statistics. DOI: 10.1119/1.5025295 164 The Physics Teacher ◆ Vol. 56, March 2018 % of degree recipients who are African American, Hispanic, or Nave American women http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Physics Teacher American Association of Physics Teachers

African American, Hispanic, and Native American women earning bachelor’s degrees in physical sciences

The Physics Teacher , Volume 56 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 2018
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American Association of Physics Teachers
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© American Association of Physicists in Medicine.
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0031-921X
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Abstract

ture undergraduate course,” J. Coll. Sci. Teach. 44 (4), 54–60 10. Colorado Upper Division Electrostatics (CUE) Assessment, (March/April 2015). http://www.colorado.edu/sei/departments/ 6. K. R. Green, T. Pinder-Grover, and J. M. Millunchick, “Im- physics_assessment.htm. pact of screencast technology: Connecting the perception of usefulness and the reality of performance,” J. Eng. Educ. 101, Nandana Weliweriya is a graduate student in physics at Kansas State 717–737 (Oct. 2012). University. He studies how undergraduate students make meaning in physics, particularly as they work on problems out loud and in groups. 7. S. A. Nonis and G. I. Hudson, “Performance of college stu- dents: Impact of study time and study habits,” J. Educ. Bus. 85 Eleanor Sayre is an associate professor of physics at Kansas State (4), 229–238 (2010). University and the research director at PhysPort. She conducts research 8. K. Clemmer, J. McCallum, J. Phillips, and T. Zachariah, “Im- on how students develop professional identity as scientists and how to proving students’ problem-solving competence with think- promote research-based teaching and assessment among physics faculty. alouds,” poster presented at the 2013 ISSOTL Conference (Oct. 2013). Dean Zollman is the director of the Center for Research and Innovation in 9. D. J. Griffiths, Introduction to Electrodynamics, 3rd ed. (Pren- STEM Education at Kansas State University and an emeritus distinguished professor of physics. His research spans curriculum development for tice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2007). teachers to graduate students as well as fundamental work in student understanding. Susan C. White, Column Editor American Institute of Physics And the Survey Says ... Statistical Research Center College Park, MD 20740; swhite@aip.org African American, Hispanic, and Native American women earning bachelor’s degrees in physical sciences etween 2003 and 2013, the total number of bach- Representation of African American, Hispanic, Belor’s degrees awarded in the United States grew by and Native American Women among 36% from 1.37 million to 1.86 million. During this same Bachelor’s Degree Recipients, 2003 and 2013 period, the number of bachelor’s degrees awarded to Af- All Degrees & Degrees in Physical Sciences rican American, Hispanic, and Native American women 14% grew by 65% from 146,495 to 240,987. Overall, the rep- resentation of these women among all bachelor’s degree 12% 2003 2013 recipients in the United States grew from 10.7% in 2003 to 10% 12.9% in 2013. These impressive gains are not mirrored in 8% the physical sciences. 6% We have compiled data on degree recipients in Earth 4% Sciences, Atmospheric Sciences, Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy, Oceanography, and Other Physical Sciences. 2% As seen in the figure, the overall representation of Afri- 0% can American, Hispanic, and Native American women All Bachelor's Degrees Bachelor's Degrees in Physical Sciences jumped between 2003 and 2013. However, their represen- Data from the National Center for Education Statistics compiled by SRC Staff tation among degree recipients in the physical sciences www.aip.org/statistics was virtually unchanged at 6%—or less than half of their representation among all degree recipients. Next month we will look at the representation of African American, Hispanic, and Native American women among degree re- cipients in engineering. Susan White is the Assistant Director of the Statistical Research Center at the American Institute of Physics; she can be reached at swhite@aip.org. Data resources are available at www.aip.org/statistics. DOI: 10.1119/1.5025295 164 The Physics Teacher ◆ Vol. 56, March 2018 % of degree recipients who are African American, Hispanic, or Nave American women

Journal

The Physics TeacherAmerican Association of Physics Teachers

Published: Mar 1, 2018

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