“Woah! It's like Spotify but for academic articles.”

Instant Access to Thousands of Journals for just $40/month

Get 2 Weeks Free

Measurement of Net Global Warming Potential in Three Agroecosystems

Measurement of Net Global Warming Potential in Three Agroecosystems When appraising the impact of food and fiber production systems on the composition of the Earth's atmosphere and the ‘greenhouse’ effect, the entire suite of biogenic greenhouse gases – carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), methane (CH 4 ), and nitrous oxide (N 2 O) – needs to be considered. Storage of atmospheric CO 2 into stable organic carbon pools in the soil can sequester CO 2 while common crop production practices can produce CO 2 , generate N 2 O, and decrease the soil sink for atmospheric CH 4 . The overall balance between the net exchange of these gases constitutes the net global warming potential (GWP) of a crop production system. Trace gas flux and soil organic carbon (SOC) storage data from long-term studies, a rainfed site in Michigan that contrasts conventional tillage (CT) and no-till (NT) cropping, a rainfed site in northeastern Colorado that compares cropping systems in NT, and an irrigated site in Colorado that compares tillage and crop rotations, are used to estimate net GWP from crop production systems. Nitrous oxide emissions comprised 40–44% of the GWP from both rain-fed sites and contributed 16–33% of GWP in the irrigated system. The energy used for irrigation was the dominant GWP source in the irrigated system. Whether a system is a sink or source of CO 2 , i.e. net GWP, was controlled by the rate of SOC storage in all sites. SOC accumulation in the surface 7.5 cm of both rainfed continuous cropping systems was approximately 1100 kg CO 2 equivalents ha −1 y −1 . Carbon accrual rates were about three times higher in the irrigated system. The rainfed systems had been in NT for >10 years while the irrigated system had been converted to NT 3 years before the start of this study. It remains to be seen if the C accrual rates decline with time in the irrigated system or if N 2 O emission rates decline or increase with time after conversion to NT. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems Springer Journals

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journal/measurement-of-net-global-warming-potential-in-three-agroecosystems-RvLXPU0GXR

You're reading a free preview. Subscribe to read or print the entire article.

And millions more from thousands of peer-reviewed journals, for just $40/month

Get 2 Weeks Free

To be the best researcher, you need access to the best research

  • With DeepDyve, you can stop worrying about how much articles cost, or if it's too much hassle to order — it's all at your fingertips. Your research is important and deserves the top content.
  • Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from Springer, Elsevier, Nature, IEEE, Wiley-Blackwell and more.
  • All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

Stop missing out on the latest updates in your field

  • We’ll send you automatic email updates on the keywords and journals you tell us are most important to you.
  • There is a lot of content out there, so we help you sift through it and stay organized.