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Jim Crow’s Daughters Different Social Class-Different Experience With Racism

Affilia , Volume 26 (2): 169 – May 1, 2011

Details

Publisher
Sage Publications
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0886-1099
eISSN
1552-3020
D.O.I.
10.1177/0886109911405489
Publisher site
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Jim Crow’s Daughters Different Social Class-Different Experience With Racism

Abstract

African American women share the common ground of surviving in a racially stratified society. Nonetheless, the diversity of their experiences emerges. This article contrasts the lived experiences of two elderly African American daughters of the Jim Crow South. Commonly shared social markers (race, gender, and historical and regional contexts) are held in contrast to their notably different social classes. Salient features of their diverse experiences corroborate the supposition that although all African American women encounter racism, social-class differences influence how racism is experienced. Family racial socialization pathways are conceptualized as reliance on personal resources versus reliance on personal defiance.
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