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Editorial

Editorial VICTAR University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK We would like to start this editorial by wishing you all a very Happy New Year. Not only is this is our fourth issue of the journal since taking over as Editors, but it also marks the beginning of our second year in this role. We outlined some of the key changes that have been made to the journal in the September issue and are pleased to report that the feedback we have received suggests these changes have been well received by readers and members of the editorial board alike. The intention of the journal is to publish work that increases our under- standing of the potential barriers to learning and participation that may be experienced by individuals with visual impairment. These potential barriers are varied and complex and this issue of the journal reflects that complexity. In earlier days the simple terms `education', `welfare' or `health' would have been considered sufficient to capture the range of topics in an issue such as this. However, these terms are increasingly seen as simplistic and narrow. Symptomatic of this change is the recent decision by the Government of the United Kingdom to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Visual Impairment SAGE

Editorial

Abstract

VICTAR University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK We would like to start this editorial by wishing you all a very Happy New Year. Not only is this is our fourth issue of the journal since taking over as Editors, but it also marks the beginning of our second year in this role. We outlined some of the key changes that have been made to the journal in the September issue and are pleased to report that the feedback we have received suggests these changes have been well received by readers and members of the editorial board alike. The intention of the journal is to publish work that increases our under- standing of the potential barriers to learning and participation that may be experienced by individuals with visual impairment. These potential barriers are varied and complex and this issue of the journal reflects that complexity. In earlier days the simple terms `education', `welfare' or `health' would have been considered sufficient to capture the range of topics in an issue such as this. However, these terms are increasingly seen as simplistic and narrow. Symptomatic of this change is the recent decision by the Government of the United Kingdom to
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