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Metacognition and cognitive monitoring: A new area of cognitive–developmental inquiry

American Psychologist , Volume 34 (10): 906 – Oct 1, 1979

Details

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 by American Psychological Association
ISSN
0003-066X
eISSN
1935-990X
D.O.I.
10.1037/0003-066X.34.10.906
Publisher site
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Metacognition and cognitive monitoring: A new area of cognitive–developmental inquiry

Abstract

Studies suggest that young children are quite limited in their knowledge about cognitive phenomena––or in their metacognition––and do relatively little monitoring of their own memory, comprehension, and other cognitive enterprises. Metacognitive knowledge is one's stored knowledge or beliefs about oneself and others as cognitive agents, about tasks, about actions or strategies, and about how all these interact to affect the outcomes of any sort of intellectual enterprise. Metacognitive experiences are conscious cognitive or affective experiences that occur during the enterprise and concern any aspect of it––often, how well it is going. Research is needed to describe and explain spontaneous developmental acquisitions in this area and find effective ways of teaching metacognitive knowledge and cognitive monitoring skills. (9 ref)
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