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Hops ( Humulus lupulus ): An Evidence-Based Systematic Review by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration

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Hops ( Humulus lupulus ): An Evidence-Based Systematic Review by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration

Abstract

Hops (Humulus lupulus) An Evidence-Based Systematic Review by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration Catherine Ulbricht, PharmD, Ethan Basch, MD, MPhil, Samuel Basch, MD, Wendy Chao, PhD, Julie Conquer, PhD, Dawn Costa, BA, BS, Samantha Culwell, PharmD, Cynthia Dacey, PharmD, Jacquelyn Guilford, MBA, PhD, Paul Hammerness, MD, Elizabeth R.B. Higdon, PharmD, Richard Isaac, Margaret Lynch, PhD, Carolyn Williams Orlando, PhD, Erica Rusie, PharmD, Minney Varghese, BS, Mamta Vora, PharmD, Regina C. Windsor, MPH, Jen Woods, BS Clinical Bottom Line Brief Background • Hops are the seed cones from the Humulus lupulus plant. The plant is a climbing vine belonging to the family Cannabaceae and is native to Europe, Asia, and North America. The common name “hop” is derived from the Anglo-Saxon hoppan (to climb). The species name lupulus is derived from the Latin lupus (wolf ), possibly based on accounts of the plant growing among willows and strangling these trees like a wolf attacking sheep. Hops are cultivated primarily in the United States, Germany, Great Britain, the Czech Republic, and China. • Hops, rich in polyphenolic compounds, are widely used to preserve beer and provide its characteristic aroma and flavor.1 Hop varieties include Willamette, Victoria, Pride of Ringwood, Cascade,
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