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E-Mail Advice

E-Mail Advice E-Mail AdviceWhen using e-mail or the Internet to communicate with patients, risk-management experts advise psychiatrists to do the following: Make sure that information posted on their practice's Web site is up-to-date and accurate. Monitor online scheduling programs carefully to ensure that confidentiality is preserved. Establish security and encryption precautions prior to using e-mail with patients. Obtain and document patients' informed consent to communicate with them by e-mail. Discuss with patients those topics that you are willing to discuss via e-mail, as well as the benefits, risks, and limitations involved with e-mail communication. Check e-mail frequently. Print e-mail exchanges with patients and keep them with patients' medical records. American Psychiatric Association « Previous | Next Article »Table of Contents This Article Psychiatric News January 6, 2006 vol. 41 no. 1 13 » Full TextFree ClassificationsProfessional News Services Email this article to a friend Similar articles in this journalSimilar articles in Web of Science Citing ArticlesLoad citing article informationCiting articles via Web of ScienceCiting articles via Google Scholar Google ScholarSearch for related content Navigate This ArticleTop HomeAboutCurrent IssuePast IssuesAll APPI JournalsSubscribeClassified AdsReprints & PermissionsContact Copyright © 2010 American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved. Print ISSN0033-2704Online ISSN1559-1255 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatric News American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc (Journal)

E-Mail Advice

Abstract

E-Mail AdviceWhen using e-mail or the Internet to communicate with patients, risk-management experts advise psychiatrists to do the following: Make sure that information posted on their practice's Web site is up-to-date and accurate. Monitor online scheduling programs carefully to ensure that confidentiality is preserved. Establish security and encryption precautions prior to using e-mail with patients. Obtain and document patients' informed consent to communicate with them by e-mail. Discuss with patients those topics that you are willing to discuss via e-mail, as well as the benefits, risks, and limitations involved with e-mail communication. Check e-mail frequently. Print e-mail exchanges with patients and keep them with patients' medical records. American Psychiatric Association « Previous | Next Article »Table of Contents This Article Psychiatric News January 6, 2006 vol. 41 no. 1 13 » Full TextFree ClassificationsProfessional News Services Email this article to a friend Similar articles in this journalSimilar articles in Web of Science Citing ArticlesLoad citing article informationCiting articles via Web of ScienceCiting articles via Google Scholar Google ScholarSearch for related content Navigate This ArticleTop HomeAboutCurrent IssuePast IssuesAll APPI JournalsSubscribeClassified AdsReprints & PermissionsContact Copyright © 2010 American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved. Print ISSN0033-2704Online ISSN1559-1255
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